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1 December 2014 Host Feeding Patterns of Mosquitoes in a Rural Malaria-Endemic Region in Hainan Island, China
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Abstract

Malaria is endemic in Wangxia Village of Hainan Island. In this area little is known about the host seeking behavior and feeding habit of mosquitoes. Three sites representing the most common habitat types in the village were selected to study the host seeking behavior and feeding habit of mosquitoes. Of the total 9 species belonging to 4 genera (Armigeres, Culex, Aedes, and Anopheles) collected in Wangxia Village, Culex tritaeniorhynchus and Cx. pipiens quinquefasciatus were the most commonly collected species. Armigeres subalbatus and Anopheles sinensis were moderately common species. Blood meal analysis confirmed that Cx. tritaeniorhynchus and Cx. p. quinquefasciatus fed on multiple hosts, mainly poultry but occasionally other animals. Anopheles sinensis, a vector of malaria, fed predominately on cattle hosts, followed by humans. Anopheles maculatus and An. barbirostris fed on both humans and domestic animals. Our results indicate that most mosquitoes in this area preferred domestic animals over humans and showed a tendency to feed on multiple hosts within the same gonotrophic cycle. Therefore, the potential role of domestic animals in arbovirus transmission should be evaluated as part of a strategy for controlling mosquito-borne diseases in this region.

2014 by The American Mosquito Control Association, Inc.
Xiao-Xia Guo, Chun-Xiao Li, Gang Wang, Zhong Zheng, Yan-De Dong, Ying-Mei Zhang, Dan Xing, and Tong-Yan Zhao "Host Feeding Patterns of Mosquitoes in a Rural Malaria-Endemic Region in Hainan Island, China," Journal of the American Mosquito Control Association 30(4), 309-311, (1 December 2014). https://doi.org/10.2987/14-6439R.1
Published: 1 December 2014
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