Translator Disclaimer
1 November 2014 The Colonization of Iceland in Light of Isotope Analyses
Author Affiliations +
Abstract
A review of the mounting archaeological evidence for the colonization of Iceland suggests that the whole country was occupied within a couple of decades towards the end of the 9th century AD. Analyses of strontium in human bones show, however, that immigrants continued to arrive in Iceland throughout the 10th century. Here we discuss this apparent contradiction, suggesting that while continued immigration may have been needed to sustain the population, these patterns arise also from biases within the burial data. We argue that formal burial, of the kind that allows isotopic analyses, reflects growing affluence and the emergence of an indigenous gentry that sought to legitimate its power through association with the perceived homeland and its upper class.
Orri Vésteinsson and Hildur Gestsdóttir "The Colonization of Iceland in Light of Isotope Analyses," Journal of the North Atlantic 2014(sp7), (1 November 2014). https://doi.org/10.3721/037.002.sp709
JOURNAL ARTICLE
9 PAGES


SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top