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1 December 2015 Comparative Efficacy of Existing Surveillance Tools for Aedes aegypti in Western Kenya
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Abstract

All traditional surveillance techniques for Aedes aegypti have been developed for the cosmopolitan domestic subspecies Ae. aegypti aegypti, and not the sylvatic subspecies, Ae. aegypti formosus. The predominant form in Western Kenya is Ae. aegypti formosus that is rarely associated with human habitations but is linked to transmission of sylvatic dengue virus strains. We compared five surveillance methods for their effectiveness in sampling Ae. aegypti formosus with the goal of determining a sustainable surveillance strategy in Kenya. The methods included larval and pupal surveys, oviposition trapping, BG-Sentinel trapping, resting boxes, and backpack aspirations. Larval and pupal surveys collected the highest number of Ae. aegypti formosus (51.3%), followed by oviposition traps (45.7%), BG-Sentinel traps (3.0%), and zero collected with either backpack aspiration or resting box collections. No Ae. aegypti formosus larvae or pupae were found indoors. The results indicate that oviposition traps and outdoor larval and pupal surveys were better surveillance methods for Ae. aegypti formosus in Western Kenya.

Sancto Yalwala, Jeffrey Clark, David Oullo, Daniel Ngonga, David Abuom, Elizabeth Wanja, and Joshua Bast "Comparative Efficacy of Existing Surveillance Tools for Aedes aegypti in Western Kenya," Journal of Vector Ecology 40(2), 301-307, (1 December 2015). https://doi.org/10.1111/jvec.12168
Received: 22 December 2014; Accepted: 1 May 2015; Published: 1 December 2015
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