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5 January 2021 Late Pleistocene Mammals from Kibogo, Kenya: Systematic Paleontology, Paleoenvironments, and Non-Analog Associations
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Abstract

We report on the Late Pleistocene (36–12 ka) mammals from Kibogo in the Nyanza Rift of western Kenya, providing (1) a systematic description of the mammal remains, (2) an assessment of their paleoenvironmental implications, and (3) an analysis of the biogeographic implications of non-analog species associations. Kibogo has yielded one of the largest paleontological assemblages from the Late Pleistocene of eastern Africa, and it is dominated by grassland ungulates (e.g., equids and alcelaphin antelopes), including an assortment of extralimital (e.g., Equus grevyi, Ceratotherium simum, Redunca arundinum) and extinct species (Syncerus antiquus, Damaliscus hypsodon, Megalotragus sp.). The composition of the fauna, in conjunction with the soils and topography of the region, indicate the local presence of edaphic grassland situated within a broader environment that was substantially grassier and likely drier than at present. In contrast to nonanalog faunas from higher latitudes (e.g., North America and western Eurasia), the climatic niches of non-analog species associations strongly overlap, indicating that non-analog climate regimes during the Late Pleistocene of eastern Africa are not necessary to account for the former association of presently allopatric species. The Kibogo faunas add to a growing body of evidence implying that the composition of present-day African herbivore communities is distinct from those of the geologically recent past.

© by the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology
J. Tyler Faith, John Rowan, Kaedan O'Brien, Nick Blegen, and Daniel J. Peppe "Late Pleistocene Mammals from Kibogo, Kenya: Systematic Paleontology, Paleoenvironments, and Non-Analog Associations," Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 40(5), (5 January 2021). https://doi.org/10.1080/02724634.2020.1841781
Received: 22 May 2020; Accepted: 1 September 2020; Published: 5 January 2021
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