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1 April 1985 MODOC-LIKE VIRUS ISOLATED FROM WILD DEER MICE (PEROMYSCUS MANICULATUS) IN ALBERTA
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Abstract

Small mammals were trapped in northeastern Alberta, Canada during 1976. Blood samples from these animals were tested for virus by inoculation of suckling mice. Blood clots from two deer mice yielded isolates of the same virus. The virus was related antigenically to a number of flaviviruses which have been isolated from mammals in Central America and North America and was related most closely to Modoc virus. Physical, chemical, and biological properties of the virus were similar also to those of Modoc virus. It did not produce illness or death in deer mice inoculated in the laboratory. Neutralization tests indicated that 1/38 (3%) red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus), 3/35 (9%) least chipmunks (Eutamius minimus), 13/109 (12%) deer mice, and 3/50 (6%) humans were infected naturally. This is the first reported evidence of infection of red squirrels and chipmunks with a Modoc-like virus. These data extend the range of Modoc-like viruses northward by 1,500 km and comprise the first isolate from mammals in the boreal forest of Canada.

Zarnke and Yuill: MODOC-LIKE VIRUS ISOLATED FROM WILD DEER MICE (PEROMYSCUS MANICULATUS) IN ALBERTA
Randall L. Zarnke and Thomas M. Yuill "MODOC-LIKE VIRUS ISOLATED FROM WILD DEER MICE (PEROMYSCUS MANICULATUS) IN ALBERTA," Journal of Wildlife Diseases 21(2), (1 April 1985). https://doi.org/10.7589/0090-3558-21.2.94
Received: 8 August 1983; Published: 1 April 1985
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