Translator Disclaimer
1 July 1986 BLOOD CHARACTERISTICS OF WHITE-TAILED DEER FROM NORTHEASTERN KANSAS
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

Blood samples were collected from 118 white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) shot on the Fort Riley Military Installation in northeastern Kansas. Values for these deer for hematocrit, glucose, alkaline phosphatase, uric acid, total protein, albumin, and calcium were within the ranges reported in previous studies for undrugged white-tailed deer. Abnormally high concentrations of serum glutamic oxaloacetate transaminase (SGOT) and lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) were attributed to general trauma and tissue damage caused by shooting the deer. Fawns had higher concentrations of alkaline phosphatase than adults and had lower concentrations in winter than at other times of the year. Serum urea nitrogen (SUN) concentrations fluctuated seasonally. Elevated concentrations of SUN in adult males killed in December were attributed to an increased catabolism of muscle protein caused by low dietary intake and high energy requirements during the rut. Cholesterol concentrations varied seasonally without regard to age or sex.

Klinger, Robel, Brown, and Brent: BLOOD CHARACTERISTICS OF WHITE-TAILED DEER FROM NORTHEASTERN KANSAS
Scott R. Klinger, Robert J. Robel, Bennett A. Brown, and Benny E. Brent "BLOOD CHARACTERISTICS OF WHITE-TAILED DEER FROM NORTHEASTERN KANSAS," Journal of Wildlife Diseases 22(3), 385-388, (1 July 1986). https://doi.org/10.7589/0090-3558-22.3.385
Received: 9 August 1985; Published: 1 July 1986
JOURNAL ARTICLE
4 PAGES


SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
Back to Top