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1 April 1990 Acute Disseminated Toxoplasmosis in a Red Fox (Vulpes vulpes)
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Abstract

A red fox (Vulpes vulpes) with signs of neurological disease was captured in Fairmount Park, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (USA). The animal died in captivity and was examined because of suspected rabies. The liver had pale foci up to 4 mm in diameter. Foci of necrosis were associated with Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites in several organs including liver, lungs and adrenal glands. Rabies antigen and distemper virus inclusions were not detected. The diagnosis of acute disseminated toxoplasmosis was confirmed by immunohistochemical staining.

Dubey, Hamir, and Rupprecht: Acute Disseminated Toxoplasmosis in a Red Fox (Vulpes vulpes)
J. P. Dubey, A. N. Hamir, and C. E. Rupprecht "Acute Disseminated Toxoplasmosis in a Red Fox (Vulpes vulpes)," Journal of Wildlife Diseases 26(2), 286-290, (1 April 1990). https://doi.org/10.7589/0090-3558-26.2.286
Received: 17 July 1989; Published: 1 April 1990
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