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1 October 1990 A FIELD TRIAL TO DETERMINE THE FEASIBILITY OF DELIVERING ORAL VACCINES TO WILD SWINE
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Abstract

A field study was conducted on Ossabaw Island, Georgia (USA) to determine the feasibility of delivering oral vaccines to wild swine (Sus scrofa). Baits were made of polymer-bound fish meal and contained a gelatin capsule as a potential vaccine chamber. Two biomarkers, iophenoxic acid and tetracycline, were incorporated into each bait, and soured chicken mash was used as an attractant. Baits (n = 1,980) were distributed in a grid pattern on a 405-ha test site and monitored for animal disturbance. Within 72 hr, 88% of 393 monitored baits were gone, and observations of track-beds surrounding 100 baits indicated that at least 52% were taken by wild swine. Subsequent testing of 80 wild swine for the biomarkers revealed that 95% of the animals had consumed bait. Track-bed observations indicated that raccoons (Procyon lotor) were the only non-target animal that frequently took baits. Biomarker analyses indicated 44% of 16 raccoons tested had eaten bait. It was concluded that oral vaccine delivery to wild swine should be considered as a feasible method of control or eradication of pseudorabies and/or swine brucellosis in wild swine if effective vaccines become available.

Fletcher, Creekmore, Smith, and Nettles: A FIELD TRIAL TO DETERMINE THE FEASIBILITY OF DELIVERING ORAL VACCINES TO WILD SWINE
W. O. Fletcher, T. E. Creekmore, M. S. Smith, and V. F. Nettles "A FIELD TRIAL TO DETERMINE THE FEASIBILITY OF DELIVERING ORAL VACCINES TO WILD SWINE," Journal of Wildlife Diseases 26(4), 502-510, (1 October 1990). https://doi.org/10.7589/0090-3558-26.4.502
Received: 25 September 1989; Published: 1 October 1990
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