Translator Disclaimer
1 October 1991 TICK INFESTATIONS OF WHITE-TAILED DEER IN ALABAMA
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

Four species of ticks were collected from 537 white-tailed deer (Odocoileus Virginianus), examined during the hunting seasons (November to January) of 1988–89 and 1989–90 at selected locations in Alabama (USA). Ixodes scapularis was the most common tick recovered (2,060 specimens) and infested 54% of the deer. Dermacentor albipictus was the second most frequent tick (1,253 specimens) and infested 15% of the deer. Amblyomma americanum was the third most frequent tick (315 specimens) and infested 24% of the deer; this was the only species of tick collected from deer at all sampling locations. Amblyomma maculatum was an infrequent parasite (five specimens) and infested only 1% of the deer; this tick species was only recorded during the 1989–90 season. Year-to-year and geographical differences in tick infestation parameters were noted. The data are compared with those reported for previous surveys of ticks infesting white-tailed deer in Alabama and adjacent states.

Durden, Luckhart, Mullen, and Smith: TICK INFESTATIONS OF WHITE-TAILED DEER IN ALABAMA
Lance A. Durden, Shirley Luckhart, Gary R. Mullen, and Sheila Smith "TICK INFESTATIONS OF WHITE-TAILED DEER IN ALABAMA," Journal of Wildlife Diseases 27(4), (1 October 1991). https://doi.org/10.7589/0090-3558-27.4.606
Received: 30 July 1990; Published: 1 October 1991
JOURNAL ARTICLE
9 PAGES


SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
Back to Top