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1 July 1994 EFFECTS OF LETHAL AND SUBLETHAL CONCENTRATIONS OF THE HERBICIDE, TRICLOPYR BUTOXYETHYL ESTER, IN THE DIET OF ZEBRA FINCHES
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Abstract

Lethal and sublethal effects of dietary triclopyr butoxyethyl ester (TBEE) on zebra finches (Poephila guttata Gould) were determined in laboratory experiments conducted between 8 January and 1 May 1991. The 8-day median lethal dietary concentration, LC50 (95% confidence interval), of TBEE to zebra finches was 1,923 (1,627 to 2,277) mg/kg. In the sublethal effects experiment, when birds were exposed to 500 mg/kg TBEE in the diet for 29 days, food consumption and body weight were significantly depressed (P < 0.05). Similar prolonged exposures to 50 and 150 mg/kg TBEE in the diet had no significant effect on food consumption or body weight (P > 0.05). Perch-hopping activity was depressed relative to controls in the 500 mg/kg group, and elevated in the 150 mg/kg group, but neither of these differences was significant (P > 0.05). Disappearance of TBEE residues from treated seeds over the 29 day experimental period followed an exponential decay model, with half-lives in the order of 15 to 18 days. On the basis of our observation that TBEE had no significant adverse effects at a concentration greater than the maximum expected environmental concentration, we propose that forestry applications of triclopyr at registered dosage rates pose little risk to wild songbirds.

Holmes, Thompson, Wainio-Keizer, Capell, and Staznik: EFFECTS OF LETHAL AND SUBLETHAL CONCENTRATIONS OF THE HERBICIDE, TRICLOPYR BUTOXYETHYL ESTER, IN THE DIET OF ZEBRA FINCHES
Stephen B. Holmes, Dean G. Thompson, Kerrie L. Wainio-Keizer, Scott S. Capell and Bozena Staznik "EFFECTS OF LETHAL AND SUBLETHAL CONCENTRATIONS OF THE HERBICIDE, TRICLOPYR BUTOXYETHYL ESTER, IN THE DIET OF ZEBRA FINCHES," Journal of Wildlife Diseases 30(3), (1 July 1994). https://doi.org/10.7589/0090-3558-30.3.319
Received: 10 May 1993; Accepted: ; Published: 1 July 1994
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