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1 January 1996 Prevalence of Hepatic Helminths and Associated Pathology in Impala (Aepyceros melampus) in Swaziland
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Abstract

The livers of impala (Aepyceros melampus) collected in the Mlawula-Mbuluzi-Simunye Nature Reserve and Protected Area complex in northeastern Swaziland from October 1985 to September 1986 were infected with three species of helminths: a nematode (Cooperioides hepaticae), a cestode (Stilesia hepatica), and a trematode (Fasciola gigantica). Cooperioides hepaticae caused a severe cholangitis. Lambs were infected at 1.5 to 2 mo of age, and the prevalence increased to 100% by 5 mo of age. The prevalence was 82% in yearlings and 44% in adults, with the highest prevalence and intensity of infection at the end of the dry season. Stilesia hepatica was found primarily in adults. Heavy infections caused a thickening and distension of the main bile ducts, but no changes were evident in the liver parenchyma. Fasciola gigantica, found only in one adult male, caused a thickening and distension of main bile duct. There was no apparent association between the helminth infections and body condition.

Gallivan, Barker, Culverwell, and Girdwood: Prevalence of Hepatic Helminths and Associated Pathology in Impala (Aepyceros melampus) in Swaziland
G. J. Gallivan, I. K. Barker, J. Culverwell, and R. Girdwood "Prevalence of Hepatic Helminths and Associated Pathology in Impala (Aepyceros melampus) in Swaziland," Journal of Wildlife Diseases 32(1), 137-141, (1 January 1996). https://doi.org/10.7589/0090-3558-32.1.137
Received: 23 November 1994; Published: 1 January 1996
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