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1 January 1996 Field Immobilization of Ethiopian Wolves (Canis simensis)
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Abstract

Telazol® (tiletamine hydrochloride and zolazepam hydrochloride combination) and a combination of ketamine hydrochloride and acepromazine were used to immobilize wild Ethiopian wolves (Canis simensis) in Ethiopia from 1988 to 1992. Telazol® doses of 2.1 to 6.5 mg/kg resulted in a mean (±SD) induction time of 2.3 ± 0.9 min and a mean (±SD) immobilization time of 82.2 ± 28.6 min. Induction time did not differ by dose, wolf weight, or age, but was significantly longer for females. Immobilization time differed with dose, but not by wolf weight, age, or sex. Total recovery times ranged from 50 to 158 min. There were no apparent side effects on immobilized animals. Wolves immobilized using a combination of ketamine hydrochloride and acetylpromazine had longer induction time (3.0 ± 0.8 min) and recovery time (114.7 ± 29.2 min). Telazol® is an effective and safe agent for immobilizing Ethiopian wolves and is preferred to ketamine/acetylpromazine.

Sillero-Zubiri: Field Immobilization of Ethiopian Wolves (Canis simensis)
Claudio Sillero-Zubiri "Field Immobilization of Ethiopian Wolves (Canis simensis)," Journal of Wildlife Diseases 32(1), 147-151, (1 January 1996). https://doi.org/10.7589/0090-3558-32.1.147
Received: 31 January 1995; Published: 1 January 1996
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