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1 July 1999 Hepatic Carcinoma with Spleen Metastasis in a California Sea Lion from the Gulf of California
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Abstract

A primary hepatic carcinoma with a neuroendocrine pattern was detected in an adult female California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) found dead on Granito Island in the Gulf of California (Mexico) in January 1996. At necropsy, several light yellow nodules of different sizes were observed on the entire surface of the liver and spleen. Microscopic examination of these nodules using routine haematoxylin-eosin stain, revealed cubic, polyhedral and pleomorphic cells with three to four bizarre mitotic figures per field (40×). An immunohisto-chemistry test revealed a positive reaction of indirect immunoperoxide to cytokeratin (CK2). This is the first known case of a primary hepatic carcinoma in free-ranging California sea lions from Mexican waters.

Acevedo-Whitehouse, Constantino-Casas, Aurioles-Gamboa, Rodríguez-Martínez, and Godínez-Reyes: Hepatic Carcinoma with Spleen Metastasis in a California Sea Lion from the Gulf of California
Karina A. Acevedo-Whitehouse, Fernando Constantino-Casas, David Aurioles-Gamboa, Hector A. Rodríguez-Martínez, and Carlos R. Godínez-Reyes "Hepatic Carcinoma with Spleen Metastasis in a California Sea Lion from the Gulf of California," Journal of Wildlife Diseases 35(3), (1 July 1999). https://doi.org/10.7589/0090-3558-35.3.565
Received: 4 December 1997; Published: 1 July 1999
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