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1 January 2002 Oral and Fecal Shedding of Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease Virus, Serotype 1 from Experimentally Infected White-tailed Deer
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Abstract

Epizootic hemorrhagic disease (EHD), one of the most important infectious diseases of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), is vectored by species of midges in the genus Culicoides.Although vector borne, fecal shedding of EHD virus, serotype 2 has been reported from infected deer in a previous study. To evaluate the potential for fecal and oral shedding, oral and rectal swabs were obtained on day 8 post-inoculation from white-tailed deer fawns experimentally infected with EHD virus, serotype 1 (EHDV-1). Eight deer were viremic for EHDV-1; virus was detected in oral swabs from three (38%) and in rectal swabs from four (50%). The ability to isolate EHDV-1 in oral secretions or feces was not dependent on being able to detect clinical disease. These results indicate that in a relatively large proportion of EHDV-1 infected deer, virus can be detected in feces and oral secretions. Although more work is necessary, such shedding may be important in experimental studies or pen situations where deer-to-deer contact is prevalent and intense.

Gaydos, Allison, Hanson, and Yellin: Oral and Fecal Shedding of Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease Virus, Serotype 1 from Experimentally Infected White-tailed Deer
Joseph K. Gaydos, Andrew B. Allison, Britta A. Hanson and Anna S. Yellin "Oral and Fecal Shedding of Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease Virus, Serotype 1 from Experimentally Infected White-tailed Deer," Journal of Wildlife Diseases 38(1), (1 January 2002). https://doi.org/10.7589/0090-3558-38.1.166
Received: 5 April 2001; Accepted: ; Published: 1 January 2002
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