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1 July 2007 FEASIBILITY OF USING COYOTES (CANIS LATRANS) AS SENTINELS FOR BOVINE MYCOBACTERIOSIS (MYCOBACTERIUM BOVIS) INFECTION IN WILD CERVIDS IN AND AROUND RIDING MOUNTAIN NATIONAL PARK, MANITOBA, CANADA
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Abstract

Elk (Cervus elaphus manitobensis) and white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in the Riding Mountain National Park (RMNP) region of southwestern Manitoba have been identified as a likely wildlife reservoir of Mycobacterium bovis, the causative agent of bovine mycobacteriosis in livestock. The feasibility of using coyotes (Canis latrans) collected from trappers as a sentinel species was investigated. Retropharyngeal, mesenteric, and colonic lymph nodes and tonsils collected at necropsy from 82 coyotes were examined by bacterial culture, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and acid-fast histopathology. Mycobacterium bovis was not identified in any animal by culture or PCR although Mycobacterium avium species were isolated. A single acid-fast organism was identified on histopathologic examination of one animal. Based on the methods used in this study, trapper-caught coyotes do not appear to be a sensitive sentinel species of M. bovis infection in cervids in and around RMNP.

Cheryl Sangster, Doug Bergeson, Cyril Lutze-Wallace, Vince Crichton, and Gary Wobeser "FEASIBILITY OF USING COYOTES (CANIS LATRANS) AS SENTINELS FOR BOVINE MYCOBACTERIOSIS (MYCOBACTERIUM BOVIS) INFECTION IN WILD CERVIDS IN AND AROUND RIDING MOUNTAIN NATIONAL PARK, MANITOBA, CANADA," Journal of Wildlife Diseases 43(3), 432-438, (1 July 2007). https://doi.org/10.7589/0090-3558-43.3.432
Received: 18 August 2006; Published: 1 July 2007
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