Translator Disclaimer
1 October 2008 DEMOGRAPHIC EFFECTS OF CANINE PARVOVIRUS ON A FREE-RANGING WOLF POPULATION OVER 30 YEARS
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

We followed the course of canine parvovirus (CPV) antibody prevalence in a subpopulation of wolves (Canis lupus) in northeastern Minnesota from 1973, when antibodies were first detected, through 2004. Annual early pup survival was reduced by 70%, and wolf population change was related to CPV antibody prevalence. In the greater Minnesota population of 3,000 wolves, pup survival was reduced by 40–60%. This reduction limited the Minnesota wolf population rate of increase to about 4% per year compared with increases of 16–58% in other populations. Because it is young wolves that disperse, reduced pup survival may have caused reduced dispersal and reduced recolonization of new range in Minnesota.

Mech, Goyal, Paul, and Newton: DEMOGRAPHIC EFFECTS OF CANINE PARVOVIRUS ON A FREE-RANGING WOLF POPULATION OVER 30 YEARS
L. David Mech, Sagar M. Goyal, William J. Paul, and Wesley E. Newton "DEMOGRAPHIC EFFECTS OF CANINE PARVOVIRUS ON A FREE-RANGING WOLF POPULATION OVER 30 YEARS," Journal of Wildlife Diseases 44(4), (1 October 2008). https://doi.org/10.7589/0090-3558-44.4.824
Received: 27 August 2007; Published: 1 October 2008
JOURNAL ARTICLE
13 PAGES


SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
Back to Top