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1 July 1973 SEROLOGIC EVIDENCE OF INFECTION OF WHITE-TAILED DEER IN TEXAS WITH THREE CALIFORNIA GROUP ARBOVIRUSES, (JAMESTOWN CANYON, SAN ANGELO, AND KEYSTONE)
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Abstract

Sera collected from 187 white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) from southern Texas in 1963, 1970, 1971, and 1972 were tested for the ability to neutralize several California group arboviruses. Jamestown Canyon virus was specifically neutralized by 99 of the 187 sera (53%). San Angelo and Keystone viruses were specifically neutralized by four and one sera respectively. Serologic evidence of infection of deer with California encephalitis or LaCrosse virus was not detected. Results of limited inoculation studies indicate that white-tailed deer are probably incidental, dead-end hosts for San Angelo and Keystone viruses. White-tailed deer are sensitive indicators of Jamestown Canyon virus and may be an important vertebrate host for this virus.

ISSEL, HOFF, and TRAINER: SEROLOGIC EVIDENCE OF INFECTION OF WHITE-TAILED DEER IN TEXAS WITH THREE CALIFORNIA GROUP ARBOVIRUSES, (JAMESTOWN CANYON, SAN ANGELO, AND KEYSTONE)
CHARLES J. ISSEL, GERALD L. HOFF, and DANIEL O. TRAINER "SEROLOGIC EVIDENCE OF INFECTION OF WHITE-TAILED DEER IN TEXAS WITH THREE CALIFORNIA GROUP ARBOVIRUSES, (JAMESTOWN CANYON, SAN ANGELO, AND KEYSTONE)," Journal of Wildlife Diseases 9(3), 245-248, (1 July 1973). https://doi.org/10.7589/0090-3558-9.3.245
Received: 23 January 1973; Published: 1 July 1973
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