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1 November 2007 Effects of Logging Pattern and Intensity on Squirrel Demography
JIM HERBERS, WALT KLENNER
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Abstract

We examined the effect of harvesting intensity and pattern on red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus), northern flying squirrels (Glaucomys sabrinus), and yellow-pine chipmunks (Tamias amoenus) in mature inland Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii glauca) forests in south-central British Columbia, Canada. We sampled squirrels 1 year before harvesting through 4 years after harvesting and estimated population parameters using open-population models. Relative to unharvested stands, each of the 3 species showed a strong response to tree removal. From 2 years to 4 years after logging, red squirrel density was 40% (SE = 7.1) lower in stands with 50% basal-area tree removal. From 1 year and up to 4 years after logging, northern flying squirrel density averaged 60% (SE = 5.2) lower in harvested treatments regardless of intensity or pattern of logging. In contrast, density of yellow-pine chipmunks increased markedly with increased logging intensity. Beginning 3 years after logging, yellow-pine chipmunk density was 734% (SE = 269) greater in stands with 50% basal-area tree removal. In the short term, harvesting intensity was a more important determinant of squirrel density than harvesting pattern. Retaining >10 m2 per ha of live residual stand structure in mature inland Douglas-fir forests maintained habitat for forest-dependent species such as red squirrels and northern flying squirrels, albeit at lower densities.

JIM HERBERS and WALT KLENNER "Effects of Logging Pattern and Intensity on Squirrel Demography," Journal of Wildlife Management 71(8), 2655-2663, (1 November 2007). https://doi.org/10.2193/2004-320
Published: 1 November 2007
JOURNAL ARTICLE
9 PAGES

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