Translator Disclaimer
1 November 2007 Bombing and Sonoran Pronghorn: A Clear and Present Danger?
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

The United States Air Force (USAF) uses part of Sonoran pronghorn (Antilocapra americana sonoriensis) habitat for bombing exercises (i.e., Barry M. Goldwater Air Force Range [BMGR], southwest AZ, USA) that could be detrimental to the endangered subspecies. To minimize injury or death to Sonoran pronghorn, the USAF and United States Fish and Wildlife Service developed a monitoring protocol that would eliminate live ordnance delivery in the vicinity of pronghorn. From 1998 to 2003, we searched for pronghorn on or near military targets prior to ordnance delivery. If we observed pronghorn within 5 km of a target, the target was closed for ≥24 hours. We monitored bombing ranges on BMGR and closed >5,000 targets for >1,000 days due to military activity. To our knowledge, no pronghorn were killed or injured. We recommend that the monitoring program continue as long as military activity occurs in pronghorn habitat.

PAUL R. KRAUSMAN, LISA K. HARRIS, RYAN R. WILSON, JAMES W. CAIN, and KIANA K. G. KOENEN "Bombing and Sonoran Pronghorn: A Clear and Present Danger?," Journal of Wildlife Management 71(8), 2820-2823, (1 November 2007). https://doi.org/10.2193/2007-212
Published: 1 November 2007
JOURNAL ARTICLE
4 PAGES

This article is only available to subscribers.
It is not available for individual sale.
+ SAVE TO MY LIBRARY

SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top