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1 June 2003 USE OF BLOOD CULTURE AS A NONLETHAL METHOD FOR ISOLATING BACTERIA FROM FISH
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Abstract

Simple nonlethal blood culture methodology, an alternative to euthanasia for diagnosing systemic bacterial infections in fish, is described. Blood was extracted from the caudal vein of 20 individuals of five fish species, incubated in brain–heart infusion broth, and then plated onto enriched blood agar. Nine of these fish were subsequently euthanized and necropsied for confirmatory tissue cultures. Five species of bacteria were isolated from the blood cultures from nine fish, and the tissue culture results in euthanized, necropsied fish agreed with the blood culture results in all cases. All the fish that were not euthanized survived for 24 hr, although two heavily parasitized fish subsequently died.

RuthEllen Klinger, Ruth Francis-Floyd, Allen Riggs, and Peggy Reed "USE OF BLOOD CULTURE AS A NONLETHAL METHOD FOR ISOLATING BACTERIA FROM FISH," Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine 34(2), 206-207, (1 June 2003). https://doi.org/10.1638/1042-7260(2003)034[0206:UOBCAA]2.0.CO;2
Received: 18 July 2002; Published: 1 June 2003
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