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1 June 2011 Abomasal Impaction in Captive Bongo (Tragelaphus eurycerus)
Zoltan S. Gyimesi, Roy B. Burns, Mark Campbell, Felicia Knightly, Lynn W. Kramer, Raymund F. Wack, Jeffery R. Zuba, D. Michael Rings
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Abstract

Fatal abomasal impaction, often combined with omasal impaction, was diagnosed in 11 bongo (Tragelaphus eurycerus) from five different zoologic collections in the United States between 1981 and 2009. Nine of 11 cases occurred in young females (10 mo–7 yr old) and typical clinical signs prior to diagnosis or death included partial or complete anorexia, dehydration, and scant fecal production. Although the clinical histories in several of the earlier cases are incomplete, clinical signs were known to begin shortly after an anesthetic event in five of 11 bongo (45%). Pedigree analysis indicates that affected bongo were descendants of multiple founders and not from a single family line, suggesting that the development of abomasal impaction is not a strictly inheritable trait. Treatment, when attempted, was variable and included abomasotomy and removal of impacted ingesta, drug therapy (prokinetic drugs, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories, antimicrobials), fluid therapy, and administration of oral lubricants or intralesional stool softeners. Based on the outcomes in the cases presented here, the prognosis for bongo with abomasal impaction is considered poor to grave.

American Association of Zoo Veterinarians
Zoltan S. Gyimesi, Roy B. Burns, Mark Campbell, Felicia Knightly, Lynn W. Kramer, Raymund F. Wack, Jeffery R. Zuba, and D. Michael Rings "Abomasal Impaction in Captive Bongo (Tragelaphus eurycerus)," Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine 42(2), 281-290, (1 June 2011). https://doi.org/10.1638/2010-0116.1
Received: 2 July 2010; Published: 1 June 2011
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