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1 September 2016 PREVALENCE OF HEALED LONG-BONE FRACTURES IN WILD CARNIVORES FROM THE NORTHEASTERN UNITED STATES
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Abstract

Museum specimens representing 12 species of terrestrial carnivores from the northeastern United States were inspected for evidence of healed long-bone fractures. Of 413 individuals, 18 (4.4%) exhibited healed fractures. Thirteen (72.2%) occurred in hind limbs; five (27.8%) occurred in forelimbs. Mustelids had the highest prevalence of healed long-bone fractures (38.8%) of all observed fractures. Within family, 5.6% of Canidae and 2.8% of Mustelidae exhibited healed fractures. Bobcats had the highest taxon prevalence of fractures, 18%. Observational data to assess use of and behavior near roads could provide insight to causes of fracture. Capture in combination with noninvasive examination techniques could be employed to determine incidence of healed fractures in wild populations. Individuals with healed fractures could then be tracked via radio telemetry to determine if these animals behave differently than uninjured conspecifics, and assess long-term survivability and fitness.

Copyright 2016 by American Association of Zoo Veterinarians
George C. Argyros and Aaron J. Roth "PREVALENCE OF HEALED LONG-BONE FRACTURES IN WILD CARNIVORES FROM THE NORTHEASTERN UNITED STATES," Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine 47(3), 879-882, (1 September 2016). https://doi.org/10.1638/2015-0180.1
Received: 7 August 2015; Published: 1 September 2016
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