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1 September 2017 USE OF ORAL FLUOXETINE FOR THE TREATMENT OF ABNORMAL AGGRESSION IN TWO RED-NECKED WALLABIES (MACROPUS RUFOGRISEUS)
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Abstract

Abnormal inter- and intraspecies aggression, perceived to be anxiety related, was identified in two male red-necked wallabies (Macropus rufogriseus) housed within a zoo. Aggressive episodes were directed at conspecifics, other exhibit animals, and, in one case, human caretakers. The clinical use of oral fluoxetine (0.5 mg/kg po bid) for a period of approximately 4 mo was effective in eliminating aggression towards humans and other animals in these two individuals. There was no evidence of recrudescence of aggression in either case following discontinuation of therapy for up to 3 yr posttreatment. Other than a period of mild transient sedation in one animal, side effects were not noted with fluoxetine treatment in these cases. Additional studies on the pharmacokinetics and side effects of fluoxetine treatment for anxiety behaviors are warranted in wallabies.

Copyright 2017 by American Association of Zoo Veterinarians
June E. Olds "USE OF ORAL FLUOXETINE FOR THE TREATMENT OF ABNORMAL AGGRESSION IN TWO RED-NECKED WALLABIES (MACROPUS RUFOGRISEUS)," Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine 48(3), 922-924, (1 September 2017). https://doi.org/10.1638/2016-0023.1
Accepted: 1 January 2017; Published: 1 September 2017
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