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1 April 2005 Fungi in dinosaurian (Isisaurus) coprolites from the Lameta Formation (Maastrichtian) and its reflection on food habit and environment
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Abstract

Plant pathogens Colletotrichum causing leaf spot and red rot disease, Erysiphe and Uncinula responsible for producing powdery mildews and microthyriaceous ascostromata making black spot on leaves were recovered from the Group A type of coprolite of Matley from the Lameta Formation. This was supposed to be voided by Isisaurus (Titanosaurus) belonging to sauropods. The presence of these fungi in the coprolites indicates that the said dinosaur ate the leaves. As these pathogens occur in all types of plants it is postulated that the Isisaurus used its long, slender neck to browse the trees like modern camels and giraffes. The coprolites also yielded Glomus – a mycorrhizal fungus which probably penetrated into it after it was voided on the surface. On the basis of epiphyllous fungi it is postulated that the dinosaurs lived in a tropical-subtropical climate.

Neeta Sharma, R. K. Kar, A. Agarwal, and Ratan Kar "Fungi in dinosaurian (Isisaurus) coprolites from the Lameta Formation (Maastrichtian) and its reflection on food habit and environment," Micropaleontology 51(1), 73-82, (1 April 2005). https://doi.org/10.1661/0026-2803(2005)051[0073:FIDICF]2.0.CO;2
Received: 17 May 2004; Accepted: 1 December 2004; Published: 1 April 2005
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