Translator Disclaimer
1 March 2014 Late-Season Patrolling Behavior and Flash Patterns of Female Photuris lucicrescens Barber (Coleoptera: Lampyridae)
Christopher M. Heckscher
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

Female fireflies in the genus Photuris are predatory on males of other firefly genera and are known to lure unsuspecting prey by mimicking female flash patterns. From 2004–2012, late-season (2 July–10 August) female Photuris lucicrescens were captured while emitting variable atypical signals on the wing and flying in loose associations in non-breeding habitat in Delaware and Pennsylvania. These observations corroborate those recognized by Herbert S. Barber in his description of the species over sixty years ago. I report these atypical flash patterns (single and multiple weak and bright flashes) and hypothesize that late-season P. lucicrescens might be patrolling non-breeding habitat in an effort to locate sedentary females who would respond to their variable male-like flash patterns. This hypothesis differs from traditional “femmes fatales” firefly models in that late-season female P. lucicrescens appear to be mimicking signaling males, rather than sedentary females, to locate prey.

Christopher M. Heckscher "Late-Season Patrolling Behavior and Flash Patterns of Female Photuris lucicrescens Barber (Coleoptera: Lampyridae)," Northeastern Naturalist 21(1), (1 March 2014). https://doi.org/10.1656/045.021.0125
Published: 1 March 2014
JOURNAL ARTICLE
PAGES


Share
SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top