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1 October 2001 DRUMMING AND CHATTERING SOUNDS RECORDED UNDERWATER IN RHODE ISLAND
Paul J. Perkins
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Abstract

Male weakfish, Cynoscion regalis, produce drumming sounds with sonic muscles that vibrate the swim bladder, and a second sound dubbed “chatter,” circumstantially linked to weakfish, is likely produced by cusk-eels (family Ophidiidae.) These sounds have been recorded in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island from early June to early September since 1965. At Middlebridge on the Pettaquamscutt River (Narrow River) there are typically 8 to 14 callers (“chattering”) present within a season, based on spectrographic and amplitude signatures. A typical chatter is a train of pulses with durations of up to 2.4 seconds with most energy between 800 Hz to 1800 Hz. Drumming consists of shorter pulse trains of lower pitch. Drumming is present in the spring, and chatter is present in the spring and summer. It was possible to identify individual chatterers throughout a season, and sound data suggest that individual fish are relatively stationary within separate ranges.

Paul J. Perkins "DRUMMING AND CHATTERING SOUNDS RECORDED UNDERWATER IN RHODE ISLAND," Northeastern Naturalist 8(3), 359-370, (1 October 2001). https://doi.org/10.1656/1092-6194(2001)008[0359:DACSRU]2.0.CO;2
Published: 1 October 2001
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