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21 December 2023 Bee Community Differences Among Urban and Rural Sites In Oregon's Willamette Valley
Briana C. Lindh, Annie Jolliff, Samantha Coleman, Marceline Skelton, Olivia Mack, Molly Hansen
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Abstract

We explored differences in bee communities between urban sites in the city of Salem, Oregon and nearby rural sites with restored areas. While cities provide habitat for some wild pollinators, urban bee communities tend to exhibit different compositions than rural ones, with urban communities particularly lacking ground-nesting and specialist oligolectic bees. We wanted to know whether these differences would still be present in a small city that is set in a heavily degraded rural landscape. We predicted that bees with narrow diet breadth would primarily use native floral resources. We found that urban and rural sites exhibited distinctly different bee community composition, both in 2018 and 2019. Bees that were indicators for rural areas tended to be large-bodied, ground-nesting, and have narrow diet breadth, but there were some surprising large-bodied ground nesters present in the city. The Bombus and Lasioglossum species that were the major drivers of the urban-rural differences were primarily associated with exotic plants in rural areas. Extreme specialist bees that used only one native plant genus were present only in rural restoration sites, but their numbers were too small to generate statistically significant patterns. Our results suggest that rural and urban land managers should be aware of the importance of the mass of floral resources provided by exotics and of the crucial importance of certain native plants that host specialist bees.

Briana C. Lindh, Annie Jolliff, Samantha Coleman, Marceline Skelton, Olivia Mack, and Molly Hansen "Bee Community Differences Among Urban and Rural Sites In Oregon's Willamette Valley," Northwest Science 96(3-4), 234-246, (21 December 2023). https://doi.org/10.3955/046.096.0307
Received: 8 January 2021; Accepted: 21 October 2022; Published: 21 December 2023
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KEYWORDS
bee communities
exotic plants
pollination networks
restoration
urban ecology
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