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1 March 2005 AMPHIBIAN, FISH STOCKING, AND HABITAT RELATIONSHIPS IN SISKIYOU MOUNTAIN WILDERNESS LAKES, CALIFORNIA AND OREGON
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Abstract

During 1999 and 2000, 10 of the 13 high-elevation lakes in and near the Red Buttes Wilderness in the Siskiyou Mountains were surveyed for amphibians. Five of the lakes had been stocked with non-native brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) for over 30 y, while fish were absent from the other 5 lakes. Pacific treefrog (Pseudacris regilla) larvae were observed in 40% of fish-bearing lakes and 80% of fishless lakes, rough-skinned newts (Taricha granulosa granulosa) were present in all study lakes, and coastal giant salamanders (Dicamptodon tenebrosus) were present in 40% of fish-bearing lakes. Pacific treefrog larvae were significantly more abundant in fishless lakes, while rough-skinned newt median abundances were identical between fish-bearing and fishless lakes. Differences in Pacific treefrog abundances and distribution between fish-bearing and fishless lakes were likely related to the presence of brook trout, but might also have been influenced by other factors such as lake morphometry and abundance of aquatic vegetation. Modifying the number or type of fish stocked in the Red Buttes Wilderness could reduce effects from fish stocking on Pacific treefrog populations.

Ian S. Reid "AMPHIBIAN, FISH STOCKING, AND HABITAT RELATIONSHIPS IN SISKIYOU MOUNTAIN WILDERNESS LAKES, CALIFORNIA AND OREGON," Northwestern Naturalist 86(1), 25-33, (1 March 2005). https://doi.org/10.1898/1051-1733(2005)086[0025:AFSAHR]2.0.CO;2
Accepted: 14 July 2004; Published: 1 March 2005
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