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8 March 2021 State of the State Tree: Historical and Modern Ecology of Kukui (Candlenut, Aleurites Moluccanus) in Hawai‘i
Noa Lincoln, Qian Zhang, Qi Chen
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Abstract

Kukui was an important element to indigenous Hawaiian agroforestry and retained some of its importance throughout Hawai‘i's history. We examine the historical ecology and trends of kukui, including a review of the ethnobotany. We use current and historical remote imagery to map kukui canopy on the five largest Hawaiian Islands. Kukui is still widespread through the state, being a significant component in many novel low-land forests. However, kukui is declining, having lost an average of ∼58% of total canopy cover over the last 70 years. Spatial trends suggest that kukui likely did not spread much following the large-scale shifts in Hawaiian socio-ecosystems that accompanied the arrival of colonial powers. We suggest that the footprint of kukui in Hawai‘i closely approximates the extent of indigenous agroforestry and forest alteration.

© 2020 by University of Hawai‘i Press. All rights reserved.
Noa Lincoln, Qian Zhang, and Qi Chen "State of the State Tree: Historical and Modern Ecology of Kukui (Candlenut, Aleurites Moluccanus) in Hawai‘i," Pacific Science 74(4), 419-434, (8 March 2021). https://doi.org/10.2984/74.4.9
Accepted: 23 September 2020; Published: 8 March 2021
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KEYWORDS
Agroecology
Agroforestry
Aleurites
candlenut
ecology
Hawai‘i
kukui
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