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1 May 2007 Cell Type-Specific Quantitative Predictions of Radiation-Induced Chromosome Aberrations: A Computer Model Approach
G. Kreth, S. K. Pazhanisamy, M. Hausmann, C. Cremer
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Abstract

Kreth, G., Pazhanisamy, S. K., Hausmann, M. and Cremer, C., Cell Type-Specific Quantitative Predictions of Radiation-Induced Chromosome Aberrations: A Computer ModelApproach. Radiat. Res. 167, 515–525 (2007).

A quantitative computer model was applied to simulate the three-dimensional (3D) spatial organization of chromatin in human cell nuclei under defined conditions of virtual irradiation to explore the implications of spatial organization on chromosome aberrations. To calibrate the virtual irradiation algorithm, a dose-dependent spectrum of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations such as dicentrics, translocations and centric rings was calculated for low-LET radiation doses ranging from 0.5 to 5 Gy. This was compared with the results from experimental studies. While the dose–response curves calculated from model simulations agree well with experimental dose–response curves for dicentrics and translocations, centric rings are significantly more frequent in the model simulation than in experiments despite taking into account exclusive arm territories in the applied Spherical 1 Mbp Chromatin Domain (SCD) computer model explicitly. Taking into account the non-random positioning of chromosome territories observed in lymphocyte cell nuclei (a so-called gene density-correlated arrangement of chromosome territories), aberration frequencies were calculated with the calibrated irradiation algorithm to investigate the impact of chromosome territory neighborhood effects (proximity effects). The absolute frequencies of pairwise exchanges agree well with those found in an experimental study. In conclusion, the results obtained using the computer model approach presented here based on only a few adjustable parameters correlated well with those of experimental studies of chromosome aberration frequencies. Thus the model may be a useful tool in radiation-induced cancer risk estimates in combination with epidemiological studies.

G. Kreth, S. K. Pazhanisamy, M. Hausmann, and C. Cremer "Cell Type-Specific Quantitative Predictions of Radiation-Induced Chromosome Aberrations: A Computer Model Approach," Radiation Research 167(5), 515-525, (1 May 2007). https://doi.org/10.1667/RR0691.1
Received: 19 April 2006; Accepted: 1 November 2006; Published: 1 May 2007
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