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1 June 2007 UPLAND FOREST VEGETATION OF THE OZARK MOUNTAINS IN NORTHWESTERN ARKANSAS
Steven L. Stephenson, Harold S. Adams, Cynthia D. Huebner
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Abstract

Quantitative data on structure and composition of all strata of vegetation were collected from 20 study sites in the Boston Mountains Subsection of the Ozark Mountains of northwestern Arkansas in June 2004. All study sites were located at upper slope or ridgetop positions and occurred at elevations > 457 m. Oaks (Quercus spp.) were dominants in the tree stratum (stems ≥ 10 cm DBH) for all 11 sites located < 549 m but in only one site > 590 m. In these higher elevation sites, various other species, including sugar maple (Acer saccharum), were relatively more important. Hickories (Carya spp.) were consistently present but usually achieved dominant or codominant status only at higher elevations. Dogwood (Cornus florida) and red maple (A. rubrum) were the two most important species represented in the small tree (stems ≥ 2.5 cm but < 10 cm DBH) stratum. The Ozark data set was compared with data obtained from a series of topographically similar study sites in the central Appalachian Mountains of eastern central West Virginia. For the tree stratum, the two regions shared 15 species in common, but these were usually quite different in importance. Oaks were relatively more important in the Ozarks but typically were underrepresented in the small tree, sapling, and seedling strata in both regions.

Steven L. Stephenson, Harold S. Adams, and Cynthia D. Huebner "UPLAND FOREST VEGETATION OF THE OZARK MOUNTAINS IN NORTHWESTERN ARKANSAS," Rhodora 109(938), 197-221, (1 June 2007). https://doi.org/10.3119/0035-4902(2007)109[197:UFVOTO]2.0.CO;2
Published: 1 June 2007
KEYWORDS
Appalachians
forest ecology
Ozarks
vegetation
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