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1 December 2016 Beech Bark Disease Reduces Sus scrofa (Boar) Rooting Intensity in Great Smoky Mountains National Park
Kileigh B. Welshofer, David B. Vandermast
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Abstract

This study examines the effect of beech bark disease (BBD) on Sus scrofa (European Wild Boar) rooting in high-elevation Beech gaps of Great Smoky Mountains National Park. In 2011, we sampled vegetative cover by stratum (canopy, shrub, herb) and European Wild Boar rooting extent in pre-existing fenced boar-exclosure plots and corresponding unfenced plots. We also used data from previous studies to compare frequencies of individual herbaceous species collected pre-BBD to those collected post-BBD. Our results indicate that mortality of Fagus grandifolia (American Beech) trees due to BBD and the consequent growth of a dense shrub-layer significantly reduced boar rooting in gaps within the Beech stands. We found that herbs were affected by both European Wild Boar and the dense shrub-cover following American Beech mortality; however, some plant species remained abundant, possibly because they were protected from detection within the shrubs.

Kileigh B. Welshofer and David B. Vandermast "Beech Bark Disease Reduces Sus scrofa (Boar) Rooting Intensity in Great Smoky Mountains National Park," Southeastern Naturalist 15(4), 669-680, (1 December 2016). https://doi.org/10.1656/058.015.0409
Published: 1 December 2016
JOURNAL ARTICLE
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