Translator Disclaimer
1 February 2018 Diet and Nematode Infection Differ Between Coastal and Inland Populations of Green Treefrogs (Hyla cinerea)
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

Progressive salinization of freshwater wetlands is likely to trigger significant changes in associated animal communities. Understanding how salinization affects fundamental natural history characteristics, like diet, is necessary to predict consequences of environmental change. We analyzed dietary patterns of Hyla cinerea (Green Treefrog), a generalist frog species known to inhabit freshwater and brackish wetlands. The stomach contents of coastal (e.g., brackish) and inland (e.g., freshwater) H. cinerea differed in both species variety and abundance of prey items. We also observed nematodes, a common anuran gut parasite, in inland individuals but did not observe any nematodes in coastal individuals. Our study shows differences in resource use and parasite load in H. cinerea, suggesting that wetland salinization may impact trophic dynamics and infectious disease in anuran amphibians.

Molly A. Albecker, William B. Brantley Jr., and Michael W. McCoy "Diet and Nematode Infection Differ Between Coastal and Inland Populations of Green Treefrogs (Hyla cinerea)," Southeastern Naturalist 17(1), 155-165, (1 February 2018). https://doi.org/10.1656/058.017.0116
Published: 1 February 2018
JOURNAL ARTICLE
11 PAGES


SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top