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1 May 2018 Assessing the Impacts of an Active Water Schedule on Vegetation Structure in the Northern Everglades
Sergio C. Gonzalez
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Abstract

As part of restoration efforts of Holey Land Wildlife Management Area (HWMA) in the northern Everglades, a pump station in the northwest corner began delivering water from the Miami Canal in 1991. In 2005, Hurricane Wilma damaged the pump, rendering it non-functional until September 2014. These events provided a unique opportunity to examine the impacts of an active water schedule on the vegetation structure of HWMA. Results of linear-regression models show a drastic increase in Typha domingensis (Southern Cattail) abundance during the period when the pump was active and a marked decrease of this species after pump failure. This change was attributable to increased nutrient inputs from canal water pumped into the area. Changes in Cladium jamaicense (Sawgrass) cover may have a lag response to fire activity.

Sergio C. Gonzalez "Assessing the Impacts of an Active Water Schedule on Vegetation Structure in the Northern Everglades," Southeastern Naturalist 17(2), 211-220, (1 May 2018). https://doi.org/10.1656/058.017.0203
Published: 1 May 2018
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