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1 September 2008 Ant Community Composition Across a Gradient of Disturbed Military Landscapes at Fort Benning, Georgia
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Abstract

Military training, soil texture, and ground cover influence ant communities at Fort Benning, a military installation in west-central Georgia. We sampled 81,237 ground-dwelling ants (47 species in 20 genera) with pitfall traps at 40 sites on a continuum from nearly pristine forest to highly disturbed training areas. We also measured 15 environmental variables related to vegetation and soil. Sites disturbed by military training had fewer trees, less canopy cover, more bare ground, and more compact soils with shallower A-horizons than comparable undisturbed sites. Pheidole bicarinata, Dorymyrmex smithi, and Pogonomyrmex badius dominated the most highly disturbed sites. Competitively submissive myrmicines, such as Aphaenogaster and Crematogaster, and formicines, such as Camponotus and Formica, were abundant in the undisturbed sites. Solenopsis invicta occurred in all but the least disturbed sites. Ant community composition was a useful indicator of disturbance at Fort Benning.

John H. Graham, Anthony J. Krzysik, David A. Kovacic, Jeffrey J. Duda, D. Carl Freeman, John M. Emlen, John C. Zak, W. Russell Long, Michael P. Wallace, Catherine Chamberlin-Graham, Jonathan P. Nutter, and Hal E. Balbach "Ant Community Composition Across a Gradient of Disturbed Military Landscapes at Fort Benning, Georgia," Southeastern Naturalist 7(3), 429-448, (1 September 2008). https://doi.org/10.1656/1528-7092-7.3.429
Published: 1 September 2008
JOURNAL ARTICLE
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