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1 September 2008 Microsite Characteristics of Scutellaria montana (Lamiaceae) in East Tennessee
John M. Mulhouse, Matthew J. Gray, Charles W. Grubb
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Abstract

We surveyed 3 populations of Scutellaria montana (Large-flowered Skullcap), a federally threatened mint, in southeastern Tennessee, and measured microsite characteristics between Large-flowered Skullcap present and absent plots in close proximity. Large-flowered Skullcap plots were typically associated with relatively open areas in forests. Further, some woody plants were positively associated with Large-flowered Skullcap (e.g., Calycanthus floridus [Common Sweetshrub], Carya glabra [Pignut Hickory]), while others were negatively associated (e.g., Vaccinium stamineum [Gooseberry], Pinus virginiana [Virginia Pine]). Linear regression revealed that Large-flowered Skullcap density increased with percent horizontal cover of grass (i.e., Poaceae) and decreased with percent vertical cover of vegetation. Our results suggest that suitable Large-flowered Skullcap sites may be characterized by secondary forests with an open understory containing grass.

John M. Mulhouse, Matthew J. Gray, and Charles W. Grubb "Microsite Characteristics of Scutellaria montana (Lamiaceae) in East Tennessee," Southeastern Naturalist 7(3), 515-526, (1 September 2008). https://doi.org/10.1656/1528-7092-7.3.515
Published: 1 September 2008
JOURNAL ARTICLE
12 PAGES


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