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15 December 2021 Questing behavior of adult Amblyomma americanum (L.) in a laboratory setting
Miranda Huang, Abby Jones, Afsoon Sabet, Jillian Masters, Natalie Dearing, Samuel F. Ward, Jerome Goddard
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Abstract

Tick-borne diseases are on the rise globally; however, information is lacking about tick questing behavior. In this laboratory study, we explored tick preferences for stem type (plastic grass, wooden, and metal), questing height, and head orientation. Using 60 Amblyomma americanum adults over three 72-hour replicates, we determined that 21.7% of ticks quested at any given time and that ticks exhibited a strong preference to quest with their heads oriented downwards, irrespective of stem type. Individual ticks tended to quest on only one stem in this study, and a maximum of three. Nonetheless, ticks appeared to prefer questing on wooden and plastic grass stems over metal stems. We did not find an effect of time of day on tick questing rates. Increased understanding of tick questing behavior can improve vector control efforts.

© Systematic & Applied Acarology Society
Miranda Huang, Abby Jones, Afsoon Sabet, Jillian Masters, Natalie Dearing, Samuel F. Ward, and Jerome Goddard "Questing behavior of adult Amblyomma americanum (L.) in a laboratory setting," Systematic and Applied Acarology 26(12), 2303-2310, (15 December 2021). https://doi.org/10.11158/saa.26.12.9
Received: 1 September 2021; Accepted: 5 October 2021; Published: 15 December 2021
KEYWORDS
Amblyomma americanum
Artificial stems
ecology
Host acquisition
questing behavior
ticks
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