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1 March 2014 Guiding Student Inquiry into Eukaryotic Organismal Biology using the Plasmodial Slime Mold Physarum polycephalum
Andrea Weeks, Beverly Bachman, Sarah Josway, Arndt F. Laemmerzahl, Brittany North
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Abstract

In order to challenge our undergraduate students' enduring misconception that plants, animals, and fungi must be “advanced” and that other eukaryotes traditionally called protists must be “primitive,” we have developed a 24-hour takehome guided inquiry and investigation of live Physarum cultures. The experiment replicates recent peer-reviewed research regarding speed—accuracy tradeoffs and reliably produces data with which students explore key biological concepts and practice essential scientific competencies. It requires minimal resources and can be adapted for high school students or more independent student investigations. We present statistical analyses of data from four semesters and provide examples of our strategies for student engagement and assessment.

©2014 by National Association of Biology Teachers. All rights reserved. Request permission to photocopy or reproduce article content at the University of California Press's Rights and Permissions Web site at www.ucpressjournals.com/reprintinfo.asp.
Andrea Weeks, Beverly Bachman, Sarah Josway, Arndt F. Laemmerzahl, and Brittany North "Guiding Student Inquiry into Eukaryotic Organismal Biology using the Plasmodial Slime Mold Physarum polycephalum," The American Biology Teacher 76(3), 196-200, (1 March 2014). https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2014.76.3.8
Published: 1 March 2014
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