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1 November 2014 The Scene of the Crime: Classroom Integration of Biosafety, Microscopy & Forensics
Michelle L. Green, Jan Novakofski, Ryan W. Green, Mary Beth Manjerovic, Nohra Mateus-Pinilla
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Abstract

Providing both introductory information and biosecurity protocols in laboratory, farm, and field settings is central to student learning and safety. However, even when clear protocols are provided, students do not fully understand the consequences of their actions. We present a crime scene that requires evidence investigation to improve basic skills and inquiry to identify biosecurity breaches. The crime-scene format engages students and encourages critical thinking about the negative effects of actions when working in various environments. This approach not only improves student skills through forensic microscopy but advances student retention of biosecurity requirements.

©2014 by National Association of Biology Teachers. All rights reserved. Request permission to photocopy or reproduce article content at the University of California Press's Rights and Permissions Web site at www.ucpressjoumals.com/reprintinfo.asp.
Michelle L. Green, Jan Novakofski, Ryan W. Green, Mary Beth Manjerovic, and Nohra Mateus-Pinilla "The Scene of the Crime: Classroom Integration of Biosafety, Microscopy & Forensics," The American Biology Teacher 76(9), 615-619, (1 November 2014). https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2014.76.9.8
Published: 1 November 2014
JOURNAL ARTICLE
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KEYWORDS
biosecurity
Forensics
microscopy
teaching
toxoplasmosis
zoonoses
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