Translator Disclaimer
1 October 2016 To Key or not to Key: A New Key to Simplify & Improve the Accuracy of Insect Identification
Author Affiliations +
Abstract

Insects have extraordinary species richness: over a million species have been identified, and even more await discovery and classification. Given their abundance and diversity, insects are excellent teaching tools for science classrooms. However, accurate insect identification can be especially challenging for beginning students. Accordingly, we have developed a dichotomous key that both precollege and university instructors and students can use efficiently to correctly identify 18 taxonomic orders of insects. Our key was developed to target insects most commonly encountered throughout the coastal southeastern United States, but it can easily be adapted to other regions. This key is novel in that it incorporates not only adult insects but also their immature stages. In addition, we included insects that are likely to be collected in all seasons, facilitating implementation in the classroom throughout the academic year.

© 2016 National Association of Biology Teachers. All rights reserved. Please direct all requests for permission to photocopy or reproduce article content through the University of California Press's Reprints and Permissions web page, www.ucpress.edu/journals.php?p=reprints.
Jennifer A. Zettler, Scott C. Mateer, Melanie Link-Pérez, Jennifer Brofft Bailey, Geneva Demars, and Traci Ness "To Key or not to Key: A New Key to Simplify & Improve the Accuracy of Insect Identification," The American Biology Teacher 78(8), 626-633, (1 October 2016). https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2016.78.8.626
Published: 1 October 2016
JOURNAL ARTICLE
8 PAGES

This article is only available to subscribers.
It is not available for individual sale.
+ SAVE TO MY LIBRARY

SHARE
ARTICLE IMPACT
RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS
Get copyright permission
Back to Top