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1 January 2017 Initiating & Managing Long-Term Data with Amateur Scientists
Will H. Ryan, Elise S. Gornish, Lynn Christenson, Stacey Halpern, Sandra Henderson, Gretchen Lebuhn, Thomas E. Miller
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Abstract

The value of long-term data (generally >10 years) in ecology is well known. Funding agencies clearly see the value in these data and have supported a limited number of projects to this end. However, individual researchers often see the challenges of long-term data collection as insurmountable. We propose that long-term data collection can be practical as part of any teaching or outreach program, and we provide guidance on how long-term projects can fit into a teaching and research schedule. While our primary audience is college faculty, our message is appropriate for anyone interested in establishing long-term studies. The benefits of adopting these kinds of projects include experience for students, encouraging public interest in science, increased publication potential for researchers, and increased large-scale data availability, leading to a better understanding of ecological phenomena.

© 2017 National Association of Biology Teachers. All rights reserved. Please direct all requests for permission to photocopy or reproduce article content through the University of California Press's Reprints and Permissions web page, www.ucpress.edu/journals.php?p=reprints.
Will H. Ryan, Elise S. Gornish, Lynn Christenson, Stacey Halpern, Sandra Henderson, Gretchen Lebuhn, and Thomas E. Miller "Initiating & Managing Long-Term Data with Amateur Scientists," The American Biology Teacher 79(1), 28-34, (1 January 2017). https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2017.79.1.28
Published: 1 January 2017
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