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1 September 2017 Post-Harvest Physiology of Cut Flowers: A Problem-Based, Cooperative Learning Activity for the Biology Classroom
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Abstract

This article describes a problem-based, cooperative learning activity, where students investigate the role of ethylene in flower senescence. The cooperative learning activity is contextualized in an authentic problem experienced in the cut flower industry: how can the shelf life of cut flowers be prolonged? We describe the procedure for conducting the experiment and show the affectiveness of contextualized science that includes indigenous knowledge— an approach that Gibbons calls “mode 2 knowledge production.” In addition we also give suggestions on how this type of problem-based, cooperative teaching-learning activity can be used in a school biology classroom.

© 2017 National Association of Biology Teachers. All rights reserved. Please direct all requests for permission to photocopy or reproduce article content through the University of California Press's Reprints and Permissions web page, www.ucpress.edu/journals.php?p=reprints.
Josef De Beer and Neal Petersen "Post-Harvest Physiology of Cut Flowers: A Problem-Based, Cooperative Learning Activity for the Biology Classroom," The American Biology Teacher 79(7), 578-583, (1 September 2017). https://doi.org/10.1525/abt.2017.79.7.578
Published: 1 September 2017
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