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1 January 2001 Effect of Habitat Fragmentation on Gypsy Moth (Lymantria dispar L.) Dispersal: The Quality of the Matrix
JOHN VANDERMEER, BRUCE HOFFMAN, STEFANIE L. KRANTZ-RYAN, UPEKALA WIJAYRATNE, JESSE BUFF, VERENA FRANCISCUS
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Abstract

The effect of the matrix within which habitat fragmentation occurs was studied with respect to gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L.) egg-mass number on the E. S. George Reserve in Livingston Co., Michigan, in October 1999. Overgrown old fields were assumed to be relatively high quality matrix compared to a large herbaceous swamp. Oak forest fragments were located in each matrix type as well as in a reference matrix of extensive oak forest. The mean number of egg masses in stands of black oaks (Quercus velutina) was determined for fragments in high and low quality matrices. A significant difference in gypsy moth egg-mass number between areas of high vs. low quality matrix was detected.

JOHN VANDERMEER, BRUCE HOFFMAN, STEFANIE L. KRANTZ-RYAN, UPEKALA WIJAYRATNE, JESSE BUFF, and VERENA FRANCISCUS "Effect of Habitat Fragmentation on Gypsy Moth (Lymantria dispar L.) Dispersal: The Quality of the Matrix," The American Midland Naturalist 145(1), 188-193, (1 January 2001). https://doi.org/10.1674/0003-0031(2001)145[0188:EOHFOG]2.0.CO;2
Received: 24 April 2000; Accepted: 1 August 2000; Published: 1 January 2001
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