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1 April 2002 Interactive Effects of Different Types of Herbivore Damage: Trirhabda beetle Larvae and Philaenus spittlebugs on Goldenrod (Solidago altissima)
RUTH A. HUFBAUER, RICHARD B. ROOT
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Abstract

For pairwise coevolution to occur between a plant and one of its insect herbivores, the effects on plant fitness of that herbivore must be independent of other herbivore species. Here we present an experiment designed to test whether the effects of herbivory by Trirhabda beetle larvae and Philaenus spittlebugs are additive or whether the presence of one herbivore alters the impact of the other. We found that beetles and spittlebugs feeding together on tall goldenrod (Solidago altissima) reduce the mass of the apical bud and the foliage more than would be expected from either insect feeding alone. Reductions in stem, lateral shoot and root mass were also greater than expected, but these differences were not statistically significant. A multivariate analysis to examine effects on all components of the plant revealed greater reductions in plant biomass when beetles and spittlebugs fed together than when either fed alone. This suggests that the effects of herbivory by these two insects are not independent and that neither is likely to develop a simple pairwise coevolutionary relationship with the tall goldenrod. However, because damage to goldenrods is increased when the beetles and spittlebugs feed together, these insects may select more for increased plant resistance to herbivory when feeding together than feeding separately.

RUTH A. HUFBAUER and RICHARD B. ROOT "Interactive Effects of Different Types of Herbivore Damage: Trirhabda beetle Larvae and Philaenus spittlebugs on Goldenrod (Solidago altissima)," The American Midland Naturalist 147(2), 204-213, (1 April 2002). https://doi.org/10.1674/0003-0031(2002)147[0204:IEODTO]2.0.CO;2
Accepted: 1 January 2002; Published: 1 April 2002
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