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1 July 2009 Selection of Seeds of Common Native and Non-native Plants by Granivorous Rodents in the Northeastern United States
Amirah Shahid, Danielle E. Garneau, Timothy S. McCay
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Abstract

Post-dispersal seed predation by rodents represents a potentially important element of biotic resistance to plant invasion. Selection for five different types of seeds by granivorous rodents was studied in maple-beech forests, old fields and conifer plantations in Madison County, New York. Rodents visited dishes containing equal masses of seeds of the native Cornus amomum and Rubus idaeus, and the non-native Lonicera morrowii, Rhamnus cathartica and Rosa multiflora. Greater masses of C. amomum and R. idaeus seeds were consumed during a night of mammal visitation than of the three non-native species, and pattern of selection did not differ among habitats. Rodents encountered seed dishes sooner in forested habitats than old fields. The primary seed predators in our region, Peromyscus spp., were more common at forests and plantations than old fields. Patterns of habitat use by Peromyscus spp. may aid in resisting invasion of intact forests by invasive plants; however, selection of native over non-native seeds may facilitate differential establishment of non-native invaders.

Amirah Shahid, Danielle E. Garneau, and Timothy S. McCay "Selection of Seeds of Common Native and Non-native Plants by Granivorous Rodents in the Northeastern United States," The American Midland Naturalist 162(1), 207-212, (1 July 2009). https://doi.org/10.1674/0003-0031-162.1.207
Received: 24 April 2008; Accepted: 1 October 2008; Published: 1 July 2009
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