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1 April 2004 PREDICTING DYNAMICS OF AGGREGATE LOAFING BEHAVIOR IN GLAUCOUS-WINGED GULLS (LARUS GLAUCESCENS) AT A WASHINGTON COLONY
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Abstract

Seabirds move throughout the day in changing, patchy environments as they engage in various behaviors. We studied the diurnal abundance dynamics of Glaucous-winged Gulls (Larus glaucescens) in a habitat patch dedicated to loafing in the Strait of Juan de Fuca, Washington. We constructed three differential equation models as alternative hypotheses and then used model selection techniques to choose the one that most accurately described the system. We validated the model on an independent data set, made a priori model predictions, and conducted a field test of the predictions. Clear dynamic patterns emerged in the abundance of loafing gulls, even though individuals moved in and out of the loafing area more or less continuously throughout the day. Temporal patterns in aggregate loafing behavior are predicted by three environmental factors: day of the year, height of the tide, and solar elevation. This result is important for several reasons: (1) it reduces the aggregate behavior of complicated vertebrates to a simple mathematical equation, (2) it gives an example of a field system in which animal abundances are determined largely by low dimensional exogenous forces, and (3) it provides an example of accurate quantitative prediction of animal numbers in the field. From the point of view of conservation biology and resource management, the result is important because of the pervasive need to explain and predict numbers of organisms in time and space.

Shandelle M. Henson, James L. Hayward, Christina M. Burden, Clara J. Logan, and Joseph G. Galusha "PREDICTING DYNAMICS OF AGGREGATE LOAFING BEHAVIOR IN GLAUCOUS-WINGED GULLS (LARUS GLAUCESCENS) AT A WASHINGTON COLONY," The Auk 121(2), 380-390, (1 April 2004). https://doi.org/10.1642/0004-8038(2004)121[0380:PDOALB]2.0.CO;2
Received: 18 April 2003; Accepted: 9 December 2003; Published: 1 April 2004
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