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1 January 2005 BODY MASS OF LONG-TAILED DUCKS (CLANGULA HYEMALIS) DURING INCUBATION
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Abstract

We investigated body-mass dynamics during incubation of Long-tailed Ducks (Clangula hyemalis) nesting in Canada’s central Arctic, 1998–2003. Long-tailed Duck females (n = 37) lost 7% of pre-incubation body mass during incubation; on average, females weighed 618 ± 15 g (mean ± SE) at clutch completion and 575 ± 11 g at hatch. Given the differences in body size, Long-tailed Ducks relied less on endogenous reserves than sympatric King Eiders (Somateria spectabilis), but lost less mass than similar-sized waterfowl species nesting in temperate climates. Preliminary data suggest that Long-tailed Ducks maintain similar or higher nest-attendance rates than temperate-nesting waterfowl of similar size, and we suggest that access to locally abundant, high-quality foods enable Long-tailed Duck females to maintain high incubation constancy without sacrificing female body condition. Nevertheless, Long-tailed Ducks appear to differ widely from most Arctic-nesting waterfowl in nutritional strategy for nesting.

Masse corporelle chez l’Harelde kakawi (Clangula hyemalis) au cours de l’incubation

Dana K. Kellett, Ray T. Alisauskas, Katherine R. Mehl, Kiel L. Drake, Joshua J. Traylor, and Shona L. Lawson "BODY MASS OF LONG-TAILED DUCKS (CLANGULA HYEMALIS) DURING INCUBATION," The Auk 122(1), 313-318, (1 January 2005). https://doi.org/10.1642/0004-8038(2005)122[0313:BMOLDC]2.0.CO;2
Received: 13 February 2004; Accepted: 4 October 2004; Published: 1 January 2005
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