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1 October 2006 DO NECTAR- AND FRUIT-EATING BIRDS HAVE LOWER NITROGEN REQUIREMENTS THAN OMNIVORES? AN ALLOMETRIC TEST
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Abstract

We used an allometric approach to compare the minimum nitrogen requirements (MNR) and the total endogenous nitrogen loss (TENL) of nectar- and fruit-eating birds with those of omnivorous birds. These two parameters were 4× higher in omnivores than in nectarivores and frugivores. In nectarivorous-frugivorous birds, MNR was 152.8 mg N kg−0.76 day−1; in omnivorous birds, it was 575.4 mg N kg−0.76 day−1. Similarly, TENL was 54.1 mg N kg−0.69 day−1 in nectarivores-frugivores, and 215.3 mg N kg−0.69 day−1 in omnivores. The residuals of the allometric relationships between TENL and MNR and body mass were positively correlated, which suggests that a large proportion of the interspecific variation in MNR is explained by variation in TENL. Although our results show that nectar- and fruit-eating birds have low nitrogen requirements, the mechanisms that these animals use to conserve nitrogen remain unclear.

¿Tienen las Aves Nectrarívoras y Frugívoras Requerimientos de Nitrógeno Menores que las Omnívoras? Una Prueba Alométrica

Ella Tsahar, Zeev Arad, Ido Izhaki, and Carlos Martínez del Rio "DO NECTAR- AND FRUIT-EATING BIRDS HAVE LOWER NITROGEN REQUIREMENTS THAN OMNIVORES? AN ALLOMETRIC TEST," The Auk 123(4), 1004-1012, (1 October 2006). https://doi.org/10.1642/0004-8038(2006)123[1004:DNAFBH]2.0.CO;2
Received: 23 August 2005; Accepted: 8 November 2005; Published: 1 October 2006
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