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1 July 2011 Fifty-Second Supplement to the American Ornithologists' Union Check-List of North American Birds
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This is the 11th supplement since publication of the seventh edition of the Check-list of North American Birds (American Ornithologists' Union [AOU] 1998). It summarizes decisions made between 1 April 2010 and 15 April 2011 by the AOU's Committee on Classification and Nomenclature—North and Middle America. The Committee has continued to operate in the manner outlined in the 42nd Supplement (AOU 2000). There were no changes to committee membership in 2010.

Changes in this supplement include the following: (1) six species (Pterodroma rostrata, Procellaria aequinoctialis, Circus buffoni, Accipiter poliogaster, Gallinago solitaria, and Oryzoborus crassirostris) are added to the main list (including three species transferred from the Appendix) on the basis of new distributional information; (2) two species (Aphelocoma wollweberi and Setophaga flavescens) are added as a result of splits from species already on the list; (3) three species' names are changed (to Gallinula galeata, Charadrius nivosus, and Chaetura meridionalis) because of splits from extralimital species; (4) two species are changed (to Amazilia brevirostris and Ramphastos ambiguus) by being lumped with extralimital species; (5) the authority for one genus (Peucedramus) is changed; (6) the type localities of two species (Aethia pygmaea and Spizella breweri) are revised; (7) the distributional status of one species (Puffinus nativitatis) is changed; (8) the category of occurrence of one species (Chrysomus icterocephalus) is changed; (9) the English name of one species (Aphelocoma ultramarina) is modified as a result of a taxonomic change, and the English name of another species (Turdus nudigenis) is modified to distinguish it from an Old World species; and (10) seven species (Procellaria aequinoctialis, Tigrisoma mexicanum, Heliornis fulica, Chloroceryle amazona, Pachyramphus major, Myadestes occidentalis, and Turdus plumbeus) are added to the list of species known to occur in the United States.

More sweeping changes derive from adoption of a new classification of the Parulidae, which results in the following: (1) 40 species (Geothlypis tolmiei, G. Philadelphia, G. formosa, Setophaga plumbea, S. angelae, S. pharetra, S. citrina, S. kirtlandii, S. tigrina, S. cerulea, S. americana, S. pitiayumi, S. magnolia, S. castanea, S. fusca, S. petechia, S. pensylvanica, S. striata, S. caerulescens, S. palmarum, S. pityophila, S. pinus, S. coronata, S. dominica, S. vitellina, S. discolor, S. adelaidae, S. subita, S. delicata, S. graciae, S. nigrescens, S. townsendi, S. occidentalis, S. chrysoparia, S. virens, Basileuterus lachrymosus, Cardellina canadensis, C. pusilla, C. rubra, and C. versicolor) are transferred to currently recognized genera; (2) one genus (Myiothlypis) is added because of a split from another genus; (3) six genera (Parula, Dendroica, Wilsonia, Ergaticus, Euthlypis, and Phaeothlypis) are deleted by being lumped with other genera; and (4) a new linear sequence is adopted for genera and species in this family.

One newly recognized order (Pteroclidiformes) is added to the main list because of a split from an existing order, two newly recognized families (Sapayoidae and Tityridae) are added to the main list by splits from existing families, and one family (Eurylaimidae) is removed because of one of these splits. A new linear sequence is adopted for families in the furnarioid suboscines. Four genera (Schiffornis, Laniocera, Tityra, and Pachyramphus) are moved from incertae sedis to the new family Tityridae, and one species (Sapayoa aenigma) is moved to the new family Sapayoidae. The genus Chlorospingus is moved from the family Thraupidae to the family Emberizidae. Five genera (Luscinia, Tarsiger, Copsychus, Oenanthe, and Saxicola) are moved from the family Turdidae to the family Muscicapidae, and a new linear sequence is adopted for species in the family Muscicapidae.

Literature that provides the basis for the Committee's decisions is cited at the end of this supplement, and citations not already in the Literature Cited of the seventh edition (with supplements) become additions to it. An updated list of the bird species known from the AOU Check-list area is available at  www.aou.org/checklist/north/index.php.

The following changes to the seventh edition (page numbers refer thereto) and its supplements result from the Committee's actions:

pp. xvii–liv. Change the number in the title of the list of species to 2,078. Insert the following names in the proper position as indicated by the text of this supplement:

  • Pterodroma rostrata Tahiti Petrel. (A)

  • Procellaria aequinoctialis White-chinned Petrel. (A)

  • Circus buffoni Long-winged Harrier. (A)

  • Accipiter poliogaster Gray-bellied Hawk. (A)

  • Gallinula galeata Common Gallinule.

  • Charadrius nivosus Snowy Plover.

  • Gallinago solitaria Solitary Snipe. (A)

  • PTEROCLIDIFORMES

  • Chaetura meridionalis Sick's Swift. (A)

  • Ramphastos ambiguus Black-mandibled Toucan.

  • SAPAYOIDAE

  • TITYRIDAE

  • Aphelocoma ultramarina Transvolcanic Jay.

  • Aphelocoma wollweberi Mexican Jay.

  • Turdus nudigenis Spectacled Thrush.

  • *Oryzoborus crassirostris Large-billed Seed-Finch.

Delete the following names:

  • Gallinula chloropus Common Moorhen.

  • Charadrius alexandrinus Snowy Plover.

  • Chaetura andrei Ashy-tailed Swift.

  • Ramphastos swainsonii Chestnut-mandibled Toucan.

  • EURYLAIMIDAE

  • Aphelocoma ultramarina Mexican Jay.

  • Turdus nudigenis Bare-eyed Thrush.

Delete the “(H)” that follows Puffinus nativitatis Christmas Shearwater.

Move PTEROCLIDIDAE and its included species to the newly inserted order PTEROCLIDIFORMES, to follow Fratercula cirrhata.

Transfer Sapayoa aenigma to the newly inserted family SAPAYOIDAE, to follow Campephilus imperialis.

Change the sequence of families in the furnarioid suboscines (FURNARIIDAE through RHINOCRYPTIDAE) to:

  • THAMNOPHILIDAE

  • CONOPOPHAGIDAE

  • GRALLARIIDAE

  • RHINOCRYPTIDAE

  • FORMICARIIDAE

  • FURNARIIDAE

Transfer Schiffornis turdina, Laniocera rufescens, the two species of Tityra, and the nine species of Pachyramphus, in this sequence, to the newly inserted family TITYRIDAE, to precede COTINGIDAE. Leave Piprites griseiceps as Genus INCERTAE SEDIS within the Tyrannidae, following Tyrannus savana.

Move the four species of Luscinia, Tarsiger cyanurus, Copsychus malabaricus, Oenanthe oenanthe, and Saxicola torquatus to MUSCICAPIDAE, and rearrange the species in this family in the following sequence:

  • Muscicapa griseisticta Gray-streaked Flycatcher.

  • Muscicapa dauurica Asian Brown Flycatcher.

  • Muscicapa striata Spotted Flycatcher.

  • Muscicapa sibirica Dark-sided Flycatcher.

  • Copsychus malabaricus White-rumped Shama.

  • Luscinia sibilans Rufous-tailed Robin.

  • Luscinia calliope Siberian Rubythroat.

  • Luscinia svecica Bluethroat.

  • Luscinia cyane Siberian Blue Robin.

  • Tarsiger cyanurus Red-flanked Bluetail.

  • Ficedula narcissina Narcissus Flycatcher.

  • Ficedula mugimaki Mugimaki Flycatcher.

  • Ficedula albicilla Taiga Flycatcher.

  • Oenanthe oenanthe Northern Wheatear.

  • Saxicola torquatus Stonechat.

Rearrange the generic placements and sequence of species in PARULIDAE to the following:

  • Seiurus aurocapilla Ovenbird.

  • Helmitheros vermivorum Worm-eating Warbler.

  • Parkesia motacilla Louisiana Waterthrush.

  • Parkesia noveboracensis Northern Waterthrush.

  • Vermivora bachmanii Bachman's Warbler.

  • Vermivora chrysoptera Golden-winged Warbler.

  • Vermivora cyanoptera Blue-winged Warbler.

  • Mniotilta varia Black-and-white Warbler.

  • Protonotaria citrea Prothonotary Warbler.

  • Limnothlypis swainsonii Swainson's Warbler.

  • Oreothlypis superciliosa Crescent-chested Warbler.

  • Oreothlypis gutturalis Flame-throated Warbler.

  • Oreothlypis peregrina Tennessee Warbler.

  • Oreothlypis celata Orange-crowned Warbler.

  • Oreothlypis crissalis Colima Warbler.

  • Oreothlypis luciae Lucy's Warbler.

  • Oreothlypis ruficapilla Nashville Warbler.

  • Oreothlypis virginiae Virginia's Warbler.

  • Leucopeza semperi Semper's Warbler.

  • Oporornis agilis Connecticut Warbler.

  • Geothlypis poliocephala Gray-crowned Yellowthroat.

  • Geothlypis aequinoctialis Masked Yellowthroat.

  • Geothlypis tolmiei MacGillivray's Warbler.

  • Geothlypis Philadelphia Mourning Warbler.

  • Geothlypis formosa Kentucky Warbler.

  • Geothlypis semiflava Olive-crowned Yellowthroat.

  • Geothlypis speciosa Black-polled Yellowthroat.

  • Geothlypis beldingi Belding's Yellowthroat.

  • Geothlypis rostrata Bahama Yellowthroat.

  • Geothlypis flavovelata Altamira Yellowthroat.

  • Geothlypis trichas Common Yellowthroat.

  • Geothlypis nelsoni Hooded Yellowthroat.

  • Catharopeza bishopi Whistling Warbler.

  • Setophaga plumbea Plumbeous Warbler.

  • Setophaga angelae Elfin-woods Warbler.

  • Setophaga pharetra Arrowhead Warbler.

  • Setophaga citrina Hooded Warbler.

  • Setophaga ruticilla American Redstart.

  • Setophaga kirtlandii Kirtland's Warbler.

  • Setophaga tigrina Cape May Warbler.

  • Setophaga cerulea Cerulean Warbler.

  • Setophaga americana Northern Parula.

  • Setophaga pitiayumi Tropical Parula.

  • Setophaga magnolia Magnolia Warbler.

  • Setophaga castanea Bay-breasted Warbler.

  • Setophaga fusca Blackburnian Warbler.

  • Setophaga petechia Yellow Warbler.

  • Setophaga pensylvanica Chestnut-sided Warbler.

  • Setophaga striata Blackpoll Warbler.

  • Setophaga caerulescens Black-throated Blue Warbler.

  • Setophaga palmarum Palm Warbler.

  • Setophaga pityophila Olive-capped Warbler.

  • Setophaga pinus Pine Warbler.

  • Setophaga coronata Yellow-rumped Warbler.

  • Setophaga dominica Yellow-throated Warbler.

  • Setophaga flavescens Bahama Warbler.

  • Setophaga vitellina Vitelline Warbler.

  • Setophaga discolor Prairie Warbler.

  • Setophaga adelaidae Adelaide's Warbler.

  • Setophaga subita Barbuda Warbler.

  • Setophaga delicata St. Lucia Warbler.

  • Setophaga graciae Grace's Warbler.

  • Setophaga nigrescens Black-throated Gray Warbler.

  • Setophaga townsendi Townsend's Warbler.

  • Setophaga occidentalis Hermit Warbler.

  • Setophaga chrysoparia Golden-cheeked Warbler.

  • Setophaga virens Black-throated Green Warbler.

  • Myiothlypis fulvicauda Buff-rumped Warbler.

  • Basileuterus lachrymosus Fan-tailed Warbler.

  • Basileuterus rufifrons Rufous-capped Warbler.

  • Basileuterus melanogenys Black-cheeked Warbler.

  • Basileuterus ignotus Pirre Warbler.

  • Basileuterus belli Golden-browed Warbler.

  • Basileuterus culicivorus Golden-crowned Warbler.

  • Basileuterus tristriatus Three-striped Warbler.

  • Cardellina canadensis Canada Warbler.

  • Cardellina pusilla Wilson's Warbler.

  • Cardellina rubrifrons Red-faced Warbler.

  • Cardellina rubra Red Warbler.

  • Cardellina versicolor Pink-headed Warbler.

  • Myioborus pictus Painted Redstart.

  • Myioborus miniatus Slate-throated Redstart.

  • Myioborus torquatus Collared Redstart.

  • *Zeledonia coronata Wrenthrush.

  • *Icteria virens Yellow-breasted Chat.

  • *Xenoligea montana White-winged Warbler.

  • *Microligeapalustris Green-tailed Warbler.

  • *Teretistris fernandinae Yellow-headed Warbler.

  • *Teretistris fornsi Oriente Warbler.

Move the six species of Chlorospingus to EMBERIZIDAE to follow Junco phaeonotus.

Delete the “(A)” that follows Chrysomus icterocephalus Yellow-hooded Blackbird.

p. 16. Before the account for Bulweria bulwerii, insert the following new account:

Pterodroma rostrata (Peale). Tahiti Petrel.

Procellaria rostrata Peale, 1848, U.S. Explor. Exped. 8: 296. (Mountains about 600 feet on Tahiti, Society Islands.)

  • Habitat.—Pelagic waters; nests in burrows or rock crevices on islands.

  • Distribution.Breeds on New Caledonia and in the Society and Marquesas islands.

    Ranges at sea in the tropical and subtropical Pacific, west to off the coasts of Australia and New Guinea and east as far as the eastern Pacific (e.g., off Peruvian coast).

    Rare off the coast of Costa Rica (south and southwest of Nicoya Peninsula; Obando-Calderón et al. 2010). Sight reports near Clipperton and the Revillagigedo Islands. Sight reports from Hawaiian waters are inconclusive because of failure to distinguish this species from P. alba (Pyle 1988).

  • Notes.—Sometimes included in the genus Pseudobulweria (Bretagnolle et al. 1998).

  • p. 17. Before the account for Procellaria parkinsoni, insert the following new account:

    Procellaria aequinoctialis Linnaeus. White-chinned Petrel.

    Procellaria aequinoctialis Linnaeus, 1758, Syst. Nat. (ed. 10) 1:132. Based on “The Great Peteril” Edwards, Nat. Hist. Birds, p. 89, pl. 89 (“Cape of Good Hope”=South Georgia.)

  • Habitat.—Pelagic waters; nests in burrows on islands.

  • Distribution.Breeds on the Falkland, South Georgia, Prince Edward, Marion, Crozet, Kerguelen, Auckland, Campbell, Antipodes, and Inaccessible (Tristan da Cunha) islands.

    Ranges at sea, mostly in the South Atlantic and southern Indian oceans.

    Accidental in Texas (Rollover Pass, Galveston County, 27 April 1986; Amer. Birds 44:1158), California (west of Pigeon Point, San Mateo County, 18 October 2009; North Amer. Birds 64:119), and Maine (off Bar Harbor, 24 August 2010; North Amer. Birds in press). A report from North Carolina (Nat. Aud. Soc. Field Notes 51:39) has not been substantiated.

  • p. 20. Change the final paragraph of the Distribution statement for Puffinus nativitatis to read: Ranges at sea in the tropical Pacific Ocean east to waters off southern Mexico (between Nayarit and Oaxaca) and Costa Rica (50 km west of Cabo Blanco, Nicoya Peninsula, Puntarenas; Obando-Calderón et al. 2009).

    p. 39. A record of the Bare-throated Tiger-Heron, Tigrisoma mexicanum, in the United States is recognized. After the last sentence in the Distribution statement, add the following new paragraph: Accidental in southern Texas (Bentsen-Rio Grande Valley State Park, Hidalgo County, 21 December 2009–20 January 2010; Nirschl and Snider 2010).

    p. 92. After the account for Circus cyaneus, insert the following new account:

    Circus buffoni (Gmelin). Long-winged Harrier.

    Falco buffoni Gmelin, 1788, Syst. Nat., 1, p. 277. Based on “Cayenne Ringtail” Latham, 1781, Gen. Synop. Birds 1, p. 91. (Cayenne = French Guiana.)

  • Habitat.—Low Seasonally Wet Grassland, Campo Grassland, Second-growth Scrub, Freshwater Marshes (0–900 m; Tropical and Lower Subtropical zones).

  • Distribution.Resident from Colombia, Venezuela, Trinidad and Tobago, and the Guianas south through Brazil, eastern Bolivia, and Paraguay to northern Argentina and northern Chile. Southernmost populations are migratory.

    Casual in Panama (El Real, Darién Province, 5 November 2009; and Tocumens Marsh, Panamá Province, 11 April 2010; Angehr 2011); several additional unsubstantiated sight records from Panama.

  • p. 93. Before the account for Accipiter soloensis, insert the following new account:

    Accipiter poliogaster (Temminck). Gray-bellied Hawk.

    Falco poliogaster Natterer = Temminck, 1824, Planches Color., livr. 45, pl. 264. (Brazil. Type from Ypanema, São Paulo.)

  • Habitat.—Tropical Lowland Evergreen Forest (Tropical and Lower Subtropical zones).

  • Distribution.Resident from Colombia, Venezuela, and the Guianas south, east of the Andes, to Brazil, Bolivia, Paraguay and northeastern Argentina.

    Accidental in Costa Rica (Puerto Viejo River, La Selva Biological Station, Heredia, Puerto Viejo de Sarapiqui, 26 June 2008 and 24 March 2009; Obando-Calderón et al. 2009).

  • p. 137. Gallinula galeata is treated as a species separate from the allopatric G. chloropus. Change the scientific name, English name, and citation to:

    Gallinula galeata (Lichtenstein). Common Gallinule.

    Crex galeata Lichtenstein, 1818, Verz. Säugeth. und Vög. Berliner Mus., p. 36. (Paraguay, ex Azara.)

  • Change the Distribution statement by removing the Old World portions of the breeding and winter distributions, and “Accidental in Iceland, the Faeroe Islands, Spitsbergen, and the Commander Islands.” from the paragraph on casual and accidental occurrence.

  • Change the Notes to: Formerly treated as conspecific with G. chloropus (Linnaeus 1758) [Common Moorhen] of Eurasia (AOU 1983, 1998), but separated on the basis of differences in vocalizations and bill and shield morphology (Constantine and The Sound Approach 2006) and mitochondrial DNA (Groenenberg et al. 2008). Formerly known as Florida Gallinule.

  • p. 139. A record of the Sungrebe, Heliornis fulica, in the United States is recognized. Change the last paragraph of the Distribution statement to: Accidental in central New Mexico (Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge, Socorro County, 13 and 18 November 2008; Williams et al. 2009) and Trinidad.

    pp. 145–146. Charadrius nivosus is treated as a species separate from the allopatric C. alexandrinus. Change the scientific name and citation to:

    Charadrius nivosus (Cassin). Snowy Plover.

    Aegialitis nivosa Cassin, 1858, in Baird, Cassin, and Lawrence, Rep. Expl. and Surv. R. R. Pac, vol. 9, pp. xlvi, 696. (Presidio [near San Francisco], California.)

  • Change the Distribution statement by removing all mention of the alexandrinus group. Change the Notes to:

  • Notes.—Formerly treated as conspecific with C. alexandrinus Linnaeus, 1758, [Kentish Plover] of Eurasia (AOU 1983, 1998), but separated on the basis of differences in male advertisement calls, morphology, and mitochondrial and nuclear DNA, which indicate that the African C. marginatus Vieillot, 1818 [Whitefronted Plover] is more closely related to C. alexandrinus or C. nivosus than these two species are to each other (Küpper et al. 2009). Groups: C. nivosus and C. occidentalis (Cabanis, 1872) [Peruvian Plover]. Some sources consider Charadrius nivosus, C. alexandrinus, C. marginatus, and the Australian C. ruficapillus Temminck, 1822 [Red-capped Plover] to constitute a superspecies (Vaurie 1965, Mayr and Short 1970, Sibley and Monroe 1990), whereas others include C. javanicus Chasen, 1938 [Javan Plover] in this superspecies (Rittinghaus 1961, Wiersma 1996).

  • p. 177. After the account for Gallinago stenura, insert the following new account:

    Gallinago solitaria Hodgson. Solitary Snipe.

    Gallinago solitaria Hodgson, 1831, Gleanings in Science 3:238. (Nepal.)

  • Habitat.—Alpine areas above tree line in valleys and bogs and around springs and vegetation patches; winters at lower elevations along unfrozen streams.

  • Distribution.Breeds in mountains from south of Lake Baikal and northwestern Mongolia south and west at least to northwestern China and east as far as Chukotka in the Russian Far East (Tomkovich 2008).

    Winters from northeastern Iran, Afghanistan, and Pakistan east through the Himalayas at least as far as Arunachal Pradesh, India, and to eastern China, Korea, and Japan.

    Accidental in Alaska (Attu Island, Aleutian Islands; 24 May 2010; Withrow and Sonneborn 2011). A report of this species from St. Paul Island, Alaska (Bieber and Schuette 2009), although substantiated by photos, is considered inconclusive because of uncertainty as to the identification.

  • p. 215. Change the type locality of Aethia pygmaea to “(Bird Island, between Asia and America = Unalaska Island, Aleutian Islands, Alaska; Gibson and Banks 2010, Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash. 123:193–195.)”.

    p. 217. After the account for Fratercula cirrhata, insert the heading:

    Order PTEROCLIDIFORMES: Sandgrouse

  • After this heading insert the following:

  • Notes.—Phylogenetic analyses of mitochondrial and nuclear gene sequences (Ericson et al. 2006, Baker et al. 2007, Fain and Houde 2007, Hackett et al. 2008) have shown that the sandgrouse are an old group of uncertain affinities, not closely related to the Charadriiformes (cf. Maclean 1967, 1969; Fjeldså 1976; Sibley and Ahlquist 1990) or to the Columbiformes (cf. Olson 1970, Strauch 1978), although they may form part of an old radiation that includes the Columbiformes.

  • Remove the heading “Family Incertae Sedis” that currently precedes “Family PTEROCLIDIDAE: Sandgrouse” and the Notes that follow this family heading.

  • p. 278. Chaetura meridionalis is treated as a species separate from C. andrei. Delete the species account for C. andrei and substitute the following new species account:

  • Chaetura meridionalis Hellmayr. Sick's Swift.

    Chaetura andrei meridionalis Hellmayr, 1907, Bull. Brit. Orn. Cl. 19: 63. (state of Santiago del Estero, Argentina.)

  • Distribution.Breeds from eastern Brazil south to Paraguay, northern Argentina, and southern Brazil, ranging in winter from the breeding range north, at least casually, to Venezuela and Colombia.

    Accidental in Panama (Juan Díaz, western Panamá province, 4 August 1923; Rogers 1939).

  • Notes.—Formerly (e.g., Cory 1918, Pinto 1938, Meyer de Schauensee 1970, AOU 1983, 1998) considered a subspecies of C. andrei Berlepsch and Hartert, 1902 [Ashy-tailed Swift]. Elevation to species status follows Marin (1997).

  • p. 323. A record of the Amazon Kingfisher, Chloroceryle amazona, in the United States is recognized. Add the following paragraph to the end of the Distribution statement: Accidental in southern Texas (Laredo, Webb County, 24 January–3 February 2010; Wormington and Epstein 2010).

    p. 331. Ramphastos swainsonii is treated as a subspecies of R. ambiguus, following Remsen et al. (2011). Delete the account for Ramphastos swainsonii and insert the following new account:

    Ramphastos ambiguus Swainson. Black-mandibled Toucan.

    Ramphastos ambiguus Swainson, 1823, Zool. Illustr. 3, pl. 168 and text. (No locality = Buenavista, Colombia, by designation of Chapman, 1917, Bull. Amer. Mus. Nat. Hist. 34:328.)

  • Habitat.—Tropical Lowland Evergreen Forest, Montane Evergreen Forest (0–2,400 m; Tropical and Lower Subtropical zones).

  • Distribution.Resident [swainsonii group] in eastern Honduras (Olancho, Mosquitia), Nicaragua (Caribbean slope), Costa Rica (absent from dry northwest and most of central plateau), Panama (absent from Pacific slope from eastern Chiriquí east to western Panamá province), western and northern Colombia, and western Ecuador; and [ambiguus group] on the east slope of the Andes from northern Colombia and Venezuela south to central Peru.

  • Notes.Ramphastos swainsonii Gould, 1833 [Chestnutmandibled Toucan], was formerly (AOU 1983, 1998) considered a distinct species, but was merged with R. ambiguus because of the lack of vocal differences and because of hints of intergradation where parapatric (Haffer 1974, Stiles et al. 1999). Ramphastos ambiguus and the South American R. tucanus Linnaeus, 1758, may constitute a superspecies (Haffer 1974).

  • p. 347. Delete the heading “Family EURYLAIMIDAE: Broadbills” and the Notes that follow this heading and insert the heading “Family SAPAYOIDAE: Sapayoa” to precede the species account for Sapayoa aenigma. After the new family heading, insert the following:

    Notes: This monotypic family was formerly included in the Eurylaimidae sensu lato (e.g., Banks et al. 2008), but is here given familial status based on its long isolation from the other broadbills, as reflected in its phylogenetic, morphological, and biogeographical distinctness (Fjeldså et al. 2003, Chesser 2004, Irestedt et al. 2006, Moyle et al. 2006).

    pp. 347–372. Recent genetic studies (e.g., Moyle et al. 2009) indicate that the evolutionary relationships of the furnarioid families are not accurately reflected in the current linear sequence. Change the sequence of furnarioid families, with no changes in species sequence, to:

    • THAMNOPHILIDAE

    • CONOPOPHAGIDAE

    • GRALLARIIDAE

    • RHINOCRYPTIDAE

    • FORMICARIIDAE

    • FURNARIIDAE

    Under the heading Suborder TYRANNI: Suboscines, insert the following:

    Notes.—The sequence of furnarioid families (Thamnophilidae through Furnariidae) is derived from the phylogenetic analysis of Moyle et al. (2009).

    pp. 416–420. After the account for Tyrannus savana, change the heading Genera INCERTAE SEDIS to Genus INCERTAE SEDIS and delete the Notes under this heading. Insert the following Notes under Genus PIPRITES Cabanis:

    Notes.—The genus Piprites has presented a taxonomic challenge for more than a century. Recent genetic studies indicate that it is either the sister group to the Tyrannidae (Ericson et al. 2006, Ohlson et al. 2008) or an isolated lineage near the base of the Tyrannidae (Tello et al. 2009).

    After the account for Piprites griseiceps, insert the following heading and Notes:

    Family TITYRIDAE: Becards, Tityras, and Allies

  • Notes.—Phylogenetic analyses of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA indicate that species in the genera Schiffornis, Laniocera, Pachyramphus, and Tityra, together with three extralimital genera, form a monophyletic group distinct from other tyrannoid suboscines (Chesser 2004, Ericson et al. 2006, Barber and Rice 2007, Tello et al. 2009). The sequence of genera follows Tello et al. (2009).

  • Move Genus SCHIFFORNIS Bonaparte, Genus LANIOCERA Boie, Genus PACHYRAMPHUS Gray, and Genus TITYRA Vieillot, their citations, and their included species, in this sequence, to follow this new family heading.

  • p. 419. A record of the Gray-collared Becard, Pachyramphus major, in the United States is recognized. Add the following paragraph to the end of the Distribution statement: Accidental in southeastern Arizona (Cave Creek Canyon, Chiricahua Mountains, Cochise County, 5 June 2009; Johnston et al. 2010).

  • p. 446–447. Aphelocoma wollweberi is treated as a species separate from the allopatric A. ultramarina. In the synonymy under Aphelocoma, change the last sentence of the citation for Sieberocitta to the following: Type, by original designation, Cyanocitta ultramarina arizonae Ridgway = Aphelocoma wollweberi Kaup.

  • Remove the current species account for A. ultramarina and insert the following new species accounts:

    Aphelocoma ultramarina (Bonaparte). Transvolcanic Jay.

    Corvus ultramarinus Bonaparte, 1825, J. Acad. Nat. Sci. Philadelphia 4: 387. (Mexico; restricted to Temascáltepec, México, by van Rossem 1942, Auk 59:573.)

  • Habitat.—Pine Forest, Pine-Oak Forest (900–3,400 m; Subtropical Zone).

  • Distribution.Resident in Transvolcanic Belt of Mexico from Colima east through southern Jalisco, northern Michoacán, México, northern Morelos, Puebla, and west-central Veracruz.

  • Notes.—See comments under A. wollweberi.

  • Aphelocoma wollweberi Kaup. Mexican Jay.

    Aphelocoma wollweberi Kaup, 1854, J. für Ornith. 2: suppl., xlvii-lvi. (Zaccatekas [sic], México, restricted to Valparaíso Mountains, Zacatecas, by Pitelka 1951, Univ. Calif. Publ. Zool. 50: 330.)

  • Habitat.—Pine-Oak Forest, Gallery Forest, Pine Forest (1,200—3,400 m; Subtropical and Temperate zones).

  • Distribution.—Resident [wollweberi group] from central Arizona and isolated mountain ranges of southeastern Arizona, southwestern New Mexico, and northern Sonora south throughout Sierra Madre Occidental in Sonora, western Chihuahua, Durango, Zacatecas, and northern Jalisco, and west to Nayarit; [couchii group] from southwestern Texas (Chisos Mountains) and isolated mountains of northern Coahuila south throughout Sierra Madre Oriental in southeastern Coahuila and northwestern Nuevo Leon, south to western Veracruz, east to western Tamaulipas, and west to the central Mexican Plateau in San Luis Potosí, Querétaro, Guanajuato, and eastern Jalisco.

  • Notes.—Groups: A wollweberi [Mexican Jay] and A. couchii Baird, 1858 [Couch's Jay]. Formerly treated as conspecific with A. ultramarina under the English name Mexican Jay, but separated on the basis of differences in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA (McCormack et al. 2008, 2011), morphology, plumage, and voice (Pitelka 1951, Brown and Horvath 1989, McCormack et al. 2008). Consists of at least three distinct mitochondrial DNA lineages, but nuclear markers indicate some gene flow between couchii and potosina mtDNA lineages (McCormack et al. 2008, 2011).

  • pp. 494–498. Recent phylogenetic studies indicate that the affinities of several genera currently included in the Turdidae lie instead with the Muscicapidae, and that the current sequence of species in the Muscicapidae does not reflect their evolutionary relationships. Move Genus LUSCINIA Forster, Genus TARSIGER Hodgson, Genus COPSYCHUS Wagler, Genus OENANTHE Vieillot, and Genus SAXICOLA Bechstein, their citations, and their included species to the family Muscicapidae. Insert the following Notes after the citations for Copsychus, Oenanthe, and Saxicola, and after the first sentence in the Notes for Luscinia and Tarsiger: Formerly included in the family Turdidae, but analyses of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA (Sangster et al. 2010, Zuccon and Ericson 2010) indicate that this genus forms part of the Muscicapidae. Delete the Notes under the heading Family MUSCICAPIDAE: Old World Flycatchers.

    Rearrange the sequence of genera and species in the Muscicapidae as follows:

    • Genus Muscicapa Brisson

      • Muscicapa griseisticta (Swinhoe)

      • Muscicapa dauurica Pallas

      • Muscicapa striata (Pallas)

      • Muscicapa sibirica Gmelin

    • Genus Copsychus Wagler

      • Copsychus malabaricus (Scopoli)

    • Genus Luscinia Forster

      • Luscinia sibilans Swinhoe

      • Luscinia calliope (Pallas)

      • Luscinia svecica (Linnaeus)

      • Luscinia cyane (Pallas)

    • Genus Tarsiger Hodgson

      • Tarsiger cyanurus (Pallas)

    • Genus Ficedula Brisson

      • Ficedula narcissina (Temminck)

      • Ficedula mugimaki (Temminck)

      • Ficedula albicilla (Pallas)

    • Genus Oenanthe Vieillot

      • Oenanthe oenanthe (Linnaeus)

    • Genus Saxicola Bechstein

      • Saxicola torquatus (Linnaeus)

    p. 500. Records of the Brown-backed Solitaire, Myadestes occidentalis, in the United States are recognized. Add the following paragraph to the end of the Distribution statement: Accidental in southeastern Arizona (Madera Canyon, Santa Rita Mountains, 4–7 October 1996; Miller and Ramsey canyons, 16 July–1 August 2009; Doren 2010).

    p. 510. Change the English name for Turdus nudigenis to Spectacled Thrush, following the AOU South American Check-list Committee (Remsen et al. 2011). Change the first and second sentences of the Notes to: Also known as Bare-eyed Thrush, American Bareeyed Thrush, Naked-eyed Thrush, Yellow-eyed Thrush, and Bareeyed Robin. The English name was changed from Bare-eyed Thrush (AOU 1983, Banks et al. 2008) to avoid confusion with the African species Turdus tephronotus, also called Bare-eyed Thrush.

    p. 512. A record of the Red-legged Thrush, Turdus plumbeus, in the United States is recognized. Add the following paragraph to the end of the Distribution statement: Accidental in east-central Florida (Melbourne Beach, Brevard County, 31 May 2010; Anderson and Ponce 2010).

    p. 532. The generic name Peucedramus should be attributed to Coues, rather than Henshaw, in accordance with Article 50.1.1 of the Code of Zoological Nomenclature (ICZN 1999). Change the heading and citation for Peucedramus to:

    Genus PEUCEDRAMUS Coues

  • Peucedramus Coues, 1875, in Henshaw, Ann. Rep. Geogr. Explor. West 100th Merid., p. 201. Type, by original designation, Sylvia olivacea Giraud = Sylvia taeniata Du Bus de Gisignies.

  • pp. 532–567. Phylogenetic analysis of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences (Lovette et al. 2010) has shown that the current generic limits and linear sequence of species within the family Parulidae do not accurately reflect their evolutionary relationships. We retain the current taxonomy for Leucopeza semperi, Oporornis agilis, and Catharopeza bishopi (see below), but otherwise adopt a new classification based on their conclusions. This new classification results in the following changes:

  • Under the heading Family PARULIDAE: Wood-Warblers, insert the following:

  • Notes: Although the genus Parula is no longer recognized, the family name Parulidae is retained under Article 40.1 of the Code of Zoological Nomenclature (ICZN 1999). Sequence of species follows Lovette et al. (2010).

  • Transfer Wilsonia citrina and all species in the genera Parula and Dendroica to the genus Setophaga, and move the citations for Wilsonia, Parula, and Dendroica into the synonymy of Setophaga. Transfer Oporornis tolmiei, Oporornis Philadelphia, and Oporornis formosus, changing the species name of the latter to formosa, to the genus Geothlypis. Transfer Euthlypis lachrymosa to the genus Basileuterus, changing the species name to lachrymosus, and move the citation for Euthlypis into the synonymy of Basileuterus. Transfer Wilsonia pusilla, Wilsonia canadensis, and both species in the genus Ergaticus to the genus Cardellina, changing the species name of E. ruber to C. rubra, and move the citation for Ergaticus into the synonymy of Cardellina. Delete the genus headings and Notes for Wilsonia, Parula, Dendroica, Euthlypis, and Ergaticus. For each species formerly in these genera, make the appropriate changes in generic abbreviations within the existing Notes, and add/amend the Notes as detailed below.

  • Rearrange the sequence of genera and species in the Parulidae as follows, adding parentheses to the author names for Setophaga plumbea, angelae, vitellina, adelaidae, subita, delicata, graciae, and chrysoparia, and removing parentheses from the author names for Basileuterus lachrymosus and Cardellina versicolor:

    • Genus Seiurus Swainson

      • Seiurus aurocapilla (Linnaeus)

    • Genus Helmitheros Rafinesque

      • Helmitheros vermivorum (Gmelin)

    • Genus Parkesia Sangster

      • Parkesia motacilla (Vieillot)

      • Parkesia noveboracensis (Gmelin)

    • Genus Vermivora Swainson

      • Vermivora bachmanii (Audubon)

      • Vermivora chrysoptera (Linnaeus)

      • Vermivora cyanoptera Olson and Reveal

    • Genus Mniotilta Vieillot

      • Mniotilta varia (Linnaeus)

    • Genus Protonotaria Baird

      • Protonotaria citrea (Boddaert)

    • Genus Limnothlypis Stone

      • Limnothlypis swainsonii (Audubon)

    • Genus Oreothlypis Ridgway

      • Oreothlypis superciliosa (Hartlaub)

      • Oreothlypis gutturalis (Cabanis)

      • Oreothlypis peregrina (Wilson)

      • Oreothlypis celata (Say)

      • Oreothlypis crissalis (Salvin and Godman)

      • Oreothlypis luciae (Cooper)

      • Oreothlypis ruficapilla (Wilson)

      • Oreothlypis virginiae (Baird)

    • Genus Leucopeza Sclater

      • Leucopeza semperi (Sclater)

    • Genus Oporornis Baird

      • Oporornis agilis (Wilson)

    • Genus Geothlypis Cabanis

      • Geothlypis poliocephala Baird

      • Geothlypis aequinoctialis (Gmelin)

      • Geothlypis tolmiei (Townsend)

      • Geothlypis Philadelphia (Wilson)

      • Geothlypisformosa (Wilson)

      • Geothlypis semiflava Sclater

      • Geothlypis speciosa Sclater

      • Geothlypis beldingi Ridgway

      • Geothlypis rostrata Bryant

      • Geothlypis flavovelata Ridgway

      • Geothlypis trichas (Linnaeus)

      • Geothlypis nelsoni Richmond

    • Genus Catharopeza Sclater

      • Catharopeza bishopi (Lawrence)

    • Genus Setophaga Swainson

      • Setophaga plumbea (Lawrence)

      • Setophaga angelae (Kepler and Parkes)

      • Setophaga pharetra (Gosse)

      • Setophaga citrina (Boddaert)

      • Setophaga ruticilla (Linnaeus)

      • Setophaga kirtlandii (Baird)

      • Setophaga tigrina (Gmelin)

      • Setophaga cerulea (Wilson)

      • Setophaga americana (Linnaeus)

      • Setophaga pitiayumi (Vieillot)

      • Setophaga magnolia (Wilson)

      • Setophaga castanea (Wilson)

      • Setophaga fusca (Müller)

      • Setophaga petechia (Linnaeus)

      • Setophaga pensylvanica (Linnaeus)

      • Setophaga striata (Forster)

      • Setophaga caerulescens (Gmelin)

      • Setophaga palmarum (Gmelin)

      • Setophaga pityophila (Gundlach)

      • Setophaga pinus (Wilson)

      • Setophaga coronata (Linnaeus)

      • Setophaga dominica (Linnaeus)

      • Setophaga flavescens (Todd)

      • Setophaga vitellina (Cory)

      • Setophaga discolor (Vieillot)

      • Setophaga adelaidae (Baird)

      • Setophaga subita (Riley)

      • Setophaga delicata (Ridgway)

      • Setophaga graciae (Baird)

      • Setophaga nigrescens (Townsend)

      • Setophaga townsendi (Townsend)

      • Setophaga occidentalis (Townsend)

      • Setophaga chrysoparia (Sclater and Salvin)

      • Setophaga virens (Gmelin)

    • Genus Myiothlypis Cabanis

      • Myiothlypis fulvicauda (Spix)

    • Genus Basileuterus Cabanis

      • Basileuterus lachrymosus Bonaparte

      • Basileuterus rufifrons (Swainson)

      • Basileuterus melanogenys Baird

      • Basileuterus ignotus Nelson

      • Basileuterus belli (Giraud)

      • Basileuterus culicivorus (Deppe)

      • Basileuterus tristriatus (Tschudi)

    • Genus Cardellina Bonaparte

      • Cardellina canadensis (Linnaeus)

      • Cardellinapusilla (Wilson)

      • Cardellina rubrifrons (Giraud)

      • Cardellina rubra (Swainson)

      • Cardellina versicolor Salvin

    • Genus Myioborus Baird

      • Myioborus pictus (Swainson)

      • Myioborus miniatus (Swainson)

      • Myioborus torquatus (Baird)

    • Genus Zeledonia Ridgway

      • Zeledonia coronata Ridgway

    • Genus Icteria Vieillot

      • Icteria virens (Linnaeus)

    • Genus Xenoligea Bond

      • Xenoligea montana (Chapman)

    • Genus Microligea Cory

      • Microligea palustris (Cory)

    • Genus Teretistris Cabanis

      • Teretistris fernandinae (Lembeye)

      • Teretistris fornsi Gundlach

  • Under the heading Genus VERMIVORA Swainson, replace the existing Notes with the following:

    Notes.—Formerly included six species (peregrina, celata, ruficapilla, virginiae, crissalis, and luciae) now placed in Oreothlypis. See comments under Oreothlypis.

    Under the heading Genus OREOTHLYPIS Ridgway, replace the existing Notes with the following:

    Notes.—Genetic studies (Avise et al. 1980, Lovette and Bermingham 2002, Klein et al. 2004, Lovette and Hochachka 2006, Lovette et al. 2010) indicate that gutturalis and superciliosa are not closely related to two species formerly placed in Parula (Setophaga americana and pitiayumi), that the six species formerly placed in Vermivora are not closely related to true Vermivora (bachmanii, chrysoptera, and cyanoptera), and that gutturalis and superciliosa and the six former Vermivora species form sister groups.

    Under the heading Genus OPORORNIS Baird, replace the existing Notes with the following:

    Notes.—Formerly included three species (formosus, Philadelphia, and tolmiei) now placed in Geothlypis, from which Oporornis sensu stricto (= O. agilis) differs in locomotion, song, and general behavior (Bent 1953, Dunn and Garrett 1997). Analyses of sequences of mitochondrial DNA (Escalante et al. 2009, Lovette et al. 2010) indicate that the phylogenetic placement of O. agilis is likely outside of the expanded Geothlypis clade. An analysis of sequences of all Geothlypis and Oporornis species indicated that O. agilis is sister to Geothlypis sensu lato (Escalante et al. 2009), whereas an analysis that also included Leucopeza semperi indicated that O. agilis may be sister to this species (Lovette et al. 2010). See comments under Geothlypis.

    Under the heading Genus GEOTHLYPIS Cabanis, replace the existing Notes with the following:

    Notes.—Phylogenetic analyses of sequences of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA (Escalante et al. 2009, Lovette et al. 2010) indicate that several species often placed in Oporornis (tolmiei, Philadelphia, and formosd) are more closely related to Geothlypis species than to Oporornis sensu stricto (cf. Lowery and Monroe 1968).

    In the species accounts for Geothlypis tolmiei and G. Philadelphia, add the following sentence to the end of the Notes: Formerly placed in the genus Oporornis. See comments under Geothlypis.

    In the species account for Geothlypis formosa, insert the following:

    Notes.—Formerly placed in the genus Oporornis. See comments under Geothlypis.

    Under the heading Genus CATHAROPEZA Sclater, replace the existing Notes with the following:

    Notes.—Phylogenetic analyses of sequences of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA (Lovette et al. 2010) indicate that the monotypic genus Catharopeza is sister to Setophaga. Although sometimes merged with the former Dendroica (Bond 1967, Kepler and Parkes 1972), now Setophaga, C. bishopi is here maintained in a separate genus based on its genetic and phenotypic distinctness, including differences in voice, behavior, and morphology (Bond 1972, Andrle and Andrle 1976, Robbins and Parker 1997).

    Under the heading Genus SETOPHAGA Swainson, insert the following:

    Notes.—Phylogenetic analyses of sequences of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA (Lovette et al. 2010) indicate that all species formerly placed in Dendroica, one species formerly placed in Wilsonia (citrina), and two species formerly placed in Parula (americana and pitiayumi) form a clade with the single species traditionally placed in Setophaga (ruticilla). The generic name Setophaga has priority for this clade.

    In the species accounts for Setophaga plumbea, angelae, pharetra, pityophila, vitellina, graciae, and nigrescens, replace the existing Notes with: Formerly placed in the genus Dendroica. See comments under Setophaga.

    In the species account for Setophaga citrina, insert the following:

    Notes.—Formerly placed in the genus Wilsonia. See comments under Setophaga.

    In the species accounts for Setophaga kirtlandii, tigrina, cerulea, magnolia, castanea, fusca, petechia, pensylvanica, striata, caerulescens, palmarum, pinus, coronata, and discolor, insert the following Notes, if Notes are not present, or add the following to the end of the Notes: Formerly placed in the genus Dendroica. See comments under Setophaga.

    In the species account for Setophaga americana, add the following to the end of the Notes: Formerly placed in the genus Parula. See comments under Setophaga.

    In the species account for Setophaga pitiayumi, replace the existing Notes with: Also known as Olive-backed Warbler. Groups: S. pitiayumi [Tropical Parula] and S. graysoni (Ridgway, 1887) [Socorro Warbler]. Formerly placed in the genus Parula. See comments under Setophaga and S. americana.

    For changes to the species account for Setophaga dominica, and for a new species account for S. flavescens, see the next entry below (p. 546).

    In the species account for Setophaga adelaidae, replace the existing Notes with: Formerly included S. subita and S. delicata, now considered distinct species (Lovette et al. 1998, Lovette and Bermingham 1999). Formerly placed in the genus Dendroica. See comments under Setophaga.

    In the species accounts for Setophaga subita and delicata, replace the existing Notes with: Formerly placed in the genus Dendroica. See comments under D. adelaidae and Setophaga.

    In the species account for Setophaga townsendi, replace the existing Notes with: Setophaga townsendi, S. occidentalis, S. virens, and S. chrysoparia constitute a superspecies (Mengel 1964). Setophaga townsendi and S. occidentalis hybridize extensively in Washington, where S. townsendi appears to be expanding its range at the expense of S. occidentalis (Rohwer et al. 2001, Krosby and Rohwer 2009). Formerly placed in the genus Dendroica. See comments under Setophaga.

    In the species accounts for Setophaga occidentalis, chrysoparia, and virens, replace the existing Notes with: Formerly placed in the genus Dendroica. See comments under Setophaga and S. townsendi.

    Insert the following heading in a position following the account for Setophaga virens:

    Genus MYIOTHLYPIS Cabanis

  • Myiothlypis Cabanis, 1850, Mus. Hein. 1:17. Type, by original designation, Trichas nigrocristatus Lafresnaye.

  • Transfer Phaeothlypis fulvicauda (p. 567) to the genus Myiothlypis, delete the genus heading and Notes for Phaeothlypis, and move the citation for Phaeothlypis into the synonymy of Myiothlypis. In the species account for M. fulvicauda, insert the following at the end of the Notes: Formerly placed in the genus Phaeothlypis.

    Under the heading Genus BASILEUTERUS Cabanis, replace the existing Notes with the following:

    Notes.—Phylogenetic analyses of sequences of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA (Lovette et al. 2010) indicate that true Basileuterus consists of lachrymosus, formerly placed in Euthlypis, rufifrons, melanogenys, ignotus, belli, culicivorus, tristriatus, and the extralimital species hypoleucus and trifasciatus. Formerly included many, mostly extralimital, species now placed in the genus Myiothlypis.

    In the species account for Basileuterus lachrymosus, insert the following:

    Notes.—Formerly placed in the genus Euthlypis. See comments under Basileuterus.

    Under the heading Genus CARDELLINA Bonaparte, insert the following:

    Notes.—Phylogenetic analyses of sequences of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA (Lovette et al. 2010) indicate that two species formerly placed in the genus Wilsonia (canadensis and pusilla) and both species formerly placed in the genus Ergaticus (rubra and versicolor) form a clade with Cardellina rubrifrons. The generic name Cardellina has priority for this clade.

    In the species account for Cardellina canadensis, insert the following:

    Notes.—Formerly placed in the genus Wilsonia. See comments under Cardellina.

    In the species account for Cardellina pusilla, insert the following at the end of the Notes: Formerly placed in the genus Wilsonia. See comments under Cardellina.

    In the species accounts for Cardellina rubra and C. versicolor, insert the following at the end of the Notes: Formerly placed in the genus Ergaticus. See comments under Cardellina.

    Under the heading Genus ZELEDONIA Ridgway, replace the existing Notes with the following:

    Notes.—Phylogenetic analyses of sequences of mitochondrial DNA (Lovette and Bermingham 2002, Klicka et al. 2007) indicate that the genus Zeledonia represents an old lineage of uncertain affinities, one that may be sister to the “core Parulidae” sensu Lovette et al. (2010).

    Under the heading Genus ICTERIA Vieillot, replace the existing Notes with the following:

    Notes.—Phylogenetic analyses of sequences of mitochondrial DNA (Lovette and Bermingham 2002, Yuri and Mindell 2002, Klein et al. 2004, Klicka et al. 2007) indicate that the genus Icteria represents an old lineage of uncertain affinities, probably related to the Parulidae, Icteridae, or Emberizidae.

    Under the heading Genus XENOLIGEA Bond, replace the existing Notes with the following:

    Notes.—Phylogenetic analyses of sequences of mitochondrial DNA (Lovette and Bermingham 2002, Klein et al. 2004, Klicka et al. 2007) indicate that the genera Xenoligea and Microligea are sister taxa of uncertain affinities, likely allied to a small group of non-parulid passerines endemic to the West Indies.

    Under the heading Genus MICROLIGEA Cory, replace the existing Notes with the following:

    Notes.—See comments under Xenoligea.

    Under the heading Genus TERETISTRIS Cabanis, replace the existing Notes with the following:

    Notes.—Phylogenetic analyses of sequences of mitochondrial DNA (Lovette and Bermingham 2002, Klein et al. 2004, Klicka et al. 2007) indicate that Teretistris is a genus of uncertain affinities, likely allied to a small group of non-parulid passerines endemic to the West Indies.

    p. 546. Setophaga flavescens is treated as a species separate from S. dominica. Delete “, and also in the northern Bahama Islands (Grand Bahama, Abaco).” from the end of the breeding distribution of S. dominica. Change the Notes for S. dominica to:

    Notes.—Formerly placed in the genus Dendroica. See comments under Setophaga and S. flavescens.

    After the species account for S. dominica, insert the following new species account:

    Setophaga flavescens (Todd). Bahama Warbler.

    Dendroica flavescens Todd, 1909, Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash. 22:171. (Spencer's Point, Abaco, Bahamas.)

  • Habitat.—Pine Forest (Lower Tropical Zone).

  • Distribution.Resident on Grand Bahama, Little Abaco, and Great Abaco islands, Bahamas.

  • Notes.—Formerly treated as conspecific with Setophaga dominica (e.g., AOU 1983, 1998), but separated on the basis of song playback trials and differences in morphology, ecology, and mitochondrial DNA (McKay et al. 2010). See comments under S. dominica.

  • pp. 570–571. Remove the genus Chlorospingus, its citation, and its included species from incertae sedis within the Thraupidae and position them following the species account for Junco phaeonotus (p. 626) in the Emberizidae. After the citation for the genus, insert the following:

    Notes.—Formerly included in the family Thraupidae. Recent analyses of mitochondrial DNA (Klicka et al. 2007, DaCosta et al. 2009) indicate that Chlorospingus forms part of the New World radiation of the Emberizidae, although its exact placement remains to be determined.

    p. 594. After the account for Oryzoborus funereus, insert the following new species account:

    Oryzoborus crassirostris (Gmelin). Large-billed Seed-Finch.

    Loxia crassirostris Gmelin, 1789, Syst. Nat. 1(2):862. (Based on “Thickbilled Grosbeak” of Latham, 1783, Gen. Synop. Birds 2(1): 148 — no locality; Cayenne designated by Berlepsch and Hartert, 1902, Novit. Zool. 9:25).

  • Habitat.—Riparian Thickets, Freshwater Marshes, Secondgrowth Scrub (0–700 m; Lower Tropical Zone).

  • Distribution.Resident in eastern Panama (El Real and Yaviza, Darién, and as far west as Tortí, eastern Panama) and northern and eastern Colombia east through Venezuela to the Guianas, Trinidad (at least formerly), and northern Brazil, south to the Amazon River and northeastern Peru.

  • p. 611. Change the type locality of Spizella breweri to “(Western North America, California, New Mexico = Black Hills, Dak[ota Territory] = Laramie Range, Albany County, Wyoming; Banks and Gibson 2007, Auk 124:1083–1085.)”.

    p. 642. Chrysomus icterocephalus, added to the main list on the basis of an old specimen record from Barbados (Chesser et al. 2010), appears to be well established and breeding in extreme eastern Panama (Angehr 2011). Change the first sentence of the Distribution statement to: Breeds and resident with local seasonal movements in lowlands of eastern Panama (EI Real, Darién), northwestern Colombia (also an isolated population near Bogotá) east through Venezuela, the Guianas, and Trinidad south to the mouth of the Amazon, Brazil, and west up the Amazon to northeastern Peru.

    p. 686. Delete the account for Pterodroma rostrata from the Appendix.

    p. 687. Delete the account for Procellaria aequinoctialis from the Appendix.

    p. 690. Delete the account for Circus buffoni from the Appendix (Chesser et al. 2009).

    p. 695. Amazilia chionopectus is treated as a junior synonym of A. brevirostris, following Schuchmann (1999) and Weller and Schuchmann (2009). Change Amazilia chionopectus (Gould) to Amazilia brevirostris (Lesson) and change the citation for this species to:

    Ornismya brevirostris Lesson, 1829, Hist. Nat. Ois.-Mouches, p. xxv, pl. 77. (Guiana.)

    After the last sentence of the text of this species account, insert the following: Formerly listed as Amazilia chionopectus (Gould). Some authors place the species in the genus Agyrtria.

    pp. 705 ff. Make the following changes to the list of French names of North American birds:

    Insert the following names in the proper position as indicated by the text of this supplement:

    e01_600.gif

    Transfer Schiffornis turdina, Laniocera rufescens, the two species of Tityra, and the nine species of Pachyramphus, in this sequence, to the newly inserted TITYRIDAE, with no change in French names.

    Change the sequence of families in the furnarioid suboscines (FURNARIIDAE through RHINOCRYPTIDAE) to the following sequence, with no change in French names:

    • THAMNOPHILIDAE

    • CONOPOPHAGIDAE

    • GRALLARIIDAE

    • RHINOCRYPTIDAE

    • FORMICARIIDAE

    • FURNARIIDAE

    Move the four species of Luscinia, Tarsiger cyanurus, Copsychus malabaricus, Oenanthe oenanthe, and Saxicola torquatus to MUSCICAPIDAE, and rearrange the species in this family in the following sequence, with no change in French names:

    • Muscicapa griseisticta

    • Muscicapa dauurica

    • Muscicapa striata

    • Muscicapa sibirica

    • Copsychus malabaricus

    • Luscinia sibilans

    • Luscinia calliope

    • Luscinia svecica

    • Luscinia cyane

    • Tarsiger cyanurus

    • Ficedula narcissina

    • Ficedula mugimaki

    • Ficedula albicilla

    • Oenanthe oenanthe

    • Saxicola torquatus

    Rearrange the generic placements and sequence of species in PARULIDAE as indicated by the text of this supplement, with no change in French names.

    Change Amazilia chionopectus to Amazilia brevirostris in APPENDIX (Part 1), with no change to the French name.

    Delete the following names from the APPENDIX (Part 1):

    e02_600.gif

    Proposals considered but not accepted by the committee included division of Anas platyrhynchos (Mallard), Poecile gambeli (Mountain Chickadee), and Geothlypis aequinoctialis (Masked Yellowthroat) into two species each; division of Setophaga coronata (Yellow-rumped Warbler) into two, three, or four species; transfer of Luscinia sibilans (Rufous-tailed Robin), L. cyane (Siberian Blue Robin), and L. calliope (Siberian Rubythroat) to different genera; modification of the type locality of Poecile gambeli (Mountain Chickadee); and modification of the English names of wrens in the genus Troglodytes.

    ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

    Normand David serves as the committee's advisor for classical languages in relation to scientific names, and Michel Gosselin is the authority for French names. We thank G. R. Angehr, S. Billerman, A. Brelsford, M. R. Browning, T. Burke, T. Donegan, D. D. Gibson, S. N. G. Howell, T. R. Jervis, C. Küpper, J. E. McCormack, G. Obando-Calderon, A. P. Peterson, A. T. Peterson, G. M. Spellman, and T. Székely for assistance, suggestions, and comments.

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    R. Terry Chesser, Richard C. Banks, F. Keith Barker, Carla Cicero, Jon L. Dunn, Andrew W. Kratter, Irby J. Lovette, Pamela C. Rasmussen, J. V. Remsen, James D. Rising, Douglas F. Stotz, and Kevin Winker "Fifty-Second Supplement to the American Ornithologists' Union Check-List of North American Birds," The Auk 128(3), (1 July 2011). https://doi.org/10.1525/auk.2011.128.3.600
    Published: 1 July 2011
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