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30 July 2014 Fifty-Fifth Supplement to the American Ornithologists' Union Check-list of North American Birds
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This is the 14th supplement since publication of the 7th edition of the Check-list of North American Birds (American Ornithologists' Union [AOU] 1998). It summarizes decisions made between May 15, 2013, and May 15, 2014, by the AOU's Committee on Classification and Nomenclature—North and Middle America. The Committee has continued to operate in the manner outlined in the 42nd Supplement (AOU 2000).

Changes in this supplement include the following: (1) three species (Ciconia maguari, Phylloscopus collybita, and Sporophila lineola) are added to the main list on the basis of new distributional information; (2) four species (Thalassarche salvini, Rallus tenuirostris, Phylloscopus examinandus, and Junco insularis) are added to the main list as a result of splits from species already on the list; (3) two species (Rallus obsoletus and R. crepitans) are added to the main list and one species (Rallus longirostris) is lost because of the split of that species; (4) three species names are changed (to Ninox japonica, Gymnopithys bicolor, and Sporophila corvina) because of splits from extralimital species; (5) the distributional statement of one species (Pyrrhura picta) is changed because of splits of extralimital species; (6) the distributional statement and English name of one species (Thalassarche cauta) and the distributional statement of another (Phylloscopus borealis) are changed as a result of taxonomic changes; (7) seven genera (Leptotrygon, Zentrygon, Eupsittula, Psittacara, Cassiculus, Spermestes, and Euodice) are added as a result of splits from other genera, resulting in changes to 20 scientific names (L. veraguensis, Z. carrikeri, Z. costaricensis, Z. lawrencii, Z. albifacies, Z. chiriquensis, Z. goldmani, Eupsittula nana, E. canicularis, E. pertinax, P. holochlorus, P. strenuus, P. finschi, P. euops, P. chloropterus, P. mitratus, Cassiculus melanicterus, S. cucullata, Euodice malabarica, and E. cantans); (8) one genus (Clibanornis) is added as a result of a transfer of a species (C. rubiginosus) to a formerly extralimital genus; (9) four genera (Nandayus, Hyloctistes, Oryzoborus, and Padda) are lost by merger (into Aratinga, Automolus, Sporophila, and Lonchura, respectively) and the scientific names of seven species (Aratinga nenday, Automolus subulatus, S. nuttingi, S. funerea, S. crassirostris, S. angolensis, and L. oryzivora) are thereby changed; (10) the type locality for one species (Synthliboramphus craveri) is corrected; (11) the English names of 10 species (Buteogallus anthracinus, B. gundlachii, B. urubitinga, Phylloscopus proregulus, Chlorospingus flavopectus, C. tacarcunae, C. inornatus, C. pileatus, C. flavigularis, and C. canigularis) are changed to reflect new information on their phylogenetic relationships; (12) the English name of one species (Lonchura punctulata) is changed to conform with global usage; and (13) one species (Thalassarche eremita) is added to the Appendix. In addition, the English names of three species are transferred to other scientific names in the aftermath of taxonomic changes: thus, Clapper Rail is now the English name for Rallus crepitans rather than R. longirostris, Bicolored Antbird is now the English name for Gymnopithys bicolor rather than G. leucaspis, and Variable Seedeater is now the English name for Sporophila corvina rather than S. americana.

One family name (Locustellidae) is changed in accordance with the rules of priority for group names. New linear sequences are adopted for species in the genera Dendrocincla, Saltator, and Sporophila, and for species currently and formerly (see below) in the genera Geotrygon, Aratinga, Hyloctistes, Automolus, Thripadectes, Lonchura, and Padda, all due to new phylogenetic data.

Literature that provides the basis for the Committee's decisions is cited at the end of this supplement, and citations not already in the Literature Cited of the 7th edition (with supplements) become additions to it. A list of the bird species known from the AOU Check-list area can be found at  http://checklist.aou.org/taxa.

The following changes to the 7th edition (page numbers refer thereto) and its supplements result from the Committee's actions:

pp. xvii–liv. Change the number in the title of the list of species to 2,098. Insert the following names in the proper position as indicated by the text of this supplement:

  • Thalassarche cauta White-capped Albatross. (A)

  • Thalassarche salvini Salvin's Albatross. (A)

  • Ciconia maguari Maguari Stork. (A)

  • Buteogallus anthracinus Common Black Hawk.

  • Buteogallus gundlachii Cuban Black Hawk.

  • Buteogallus urubitinga Great Black Hawk.

  • Rallus obsoletus Ridgway's Rail.

  • Rallus tenuirostris Aztec Rail.

  • Rallus crepitans Clapper Rail.

  • Leptotrygon veraguensis Olive-backed Quail-Dove.

  • Zentrygon carrikeri Tuxtla Quail-Dove.

  • Zentrygon costaricensis Buff-fronted Quail-Dove.

  • Zentrygon lawrencii Purplish-backed Quail-Dove.

  • Zentrygon albifacies White-faced Quail-Dove.

  • Zentrygon chiriquensis Chiriqui Quail-Dove.

  • Zentrygon goldmani Russet-crowned Quail-Dove.

  • Ninox japonica Northern Boobook. (A)

  • Eupsittula nana Olive-throated Parakeet.

  • Eupsittula canicularis Orange-fronted Parakeet.

  • Eupsittula pertinax Brown-throated Parakeet.

  • Aratinga nenday Nanday Parakeet. (I)

  • Psittacara holochlorus Green Parakeet.

  • Psittacara strenuus Pacific Parakeet.

  • Psittacara finschi Crimson-fronted Parakeet.

  • Psittacara euops Cuban Parakeet.

  • Psittacara chloropterus Hispaniolan Parakeet.

  • Psittacara mitratus Mitred Parakeet. (I)

  • Gymnopithys bicolor Bicolored Antbird.

  • Clibanornis rubiginosus Ruddy Foliage-gleaner.

  • Automolus subulatus Striped Woodhaunter.

  • Phylloscopus collybita Common Chiffchaff. (A)

  • Phylloscopus proregulus Pallas's Leaf Warbler. (A)

  • Phylloscopus examinandus Kamchatka Leaf Warbler. (A)

  • LOCUSTELLIDAE

  • *Chlorospingus flavopectus Common Chlorospingus.

  • *Chlorospingus tacarcunae Tacarcuna Chlorospingus.

  • *Chlorospingus inornatus Pirre Chlorospingus.

  • *Chlorospingus pileatus Sooty-capped Chlorospingus.

  • *Chlorospingus flavigularis Yellow-throated Chlorospingus.

  • *Chlorospingus canigularis Ashy-throated Chlorospingus.

  • Cassiculus melanicterus Yellow-winged Cacique.

  • *Sporophila funerea Thick-billed Seed-Finch.

  • *Sporophila nuttingi Nicaraguan Seed-Finch.

  • *Sporophila crassirostris Large-billed Seed-Finch.

  • *Sporophila corvina Variable Seedeater.

  • *Sporophila lineola Lined Seedeater. (A)

  • Junco insularis Guadalupe Junco.

  • Spermestes cucullata Bronze Mannikin. (I)

  • Euodice malabarica Indian Silverbill. (I)

  • Euodice cantans African Silverbill. (I)

  • Lonchura oryzivora Java Sparrow. (I)

  • Lonchura punctulata Scaly-breasted Munia. (I)

Delete the following names:

  • Thalassarche cauta Shy Albatross. (A)

  • Buteogallus anthracinus Common Black-Hawk.

  • Buteogallus gundlachii Cuban Black-Hawk.

  • Buteogallus urubitinga Great Black-Hawk.

  • Rallus longirostris Clapper Rail.

  • Geotrygon veraguensis Olive-backed Quail-Dove.

  • Geotrygon albifacies White-faced Quail-Dove.

  • Geotrygon chiriquensis Chiriqui Quail-Dove.

  • Geotrygon carrikeri Tuxtla Quail-Dove.

  • Geotrygon lawrencii Purplish-backed Quail-Dove.

  • Geotrygon costaricensis Buff-fronted Quail-Dove.

  • Geotrygon goldmani Russet-crowned Quail-Dove.

  • Ninox scutulata Brown Hawk-Owl. (A)

  • Aratinga holochlora Green Parakeet.

  • Aratinga strenua Pacific Parakeet.

  • Aratinga finschi Crimson-fronted Parakeet.

  • Aratinga mitrata Mitred Parakeet. (I)

  • Aratinga chloroptera Hispaniolan Parakeet.

  • Aratinga euops Cuban Parakeet.

  • Aratinga nana Olive-throated Parakeet.

  • Aratinga canicularis Orange-fronted Parakeet.

  • Aratinga pertinax Brown-throated Parakeet.

  • Nandayus nenday Nanday Parakeet. (I)

  • Gymnopithys leucaspis Bicolored Antbird.

  • Hyloctistes subulatus Striped Woodhaunter.

  • Automolus rubiginosus Ruddy Foliage-gleaner.

  • Phylloscopus proregulus Pallas's Leaf-Warbler. (A)

  • MEGALURIDAE

  • Chlorospingus flavopectus Common Bush-Tanager.

  • Chlorospingus tacarcunae Tacarcuna Bush-Tanager.

  • Chlorospingus inornatus Pirre Bush-Tanager.

  • Chlorospingus pileatus Sooty-capped Bush-Tanager.

  • Chlorospingus flavigularis Yellow-throated Bush-Tanager.

  • Chlorospingus canigularis Ashy-throated Bush-Tanager.

  • Cacicus melanicterus Yellow-winged Cacique.

  • Oryzoborus nuttingi Nicaraguan Seed-Finch.

  • Oryzoborus funereus Thick-billed Seed-Finch.

  • Oryzoborus crassirostris Large-billed Seed-Finch.

  • Sporophila americana Variable Seedeater.

  • Lonchura malabarica Indian Silverbill. (I)

  • Lonchura cantans African Silverbill. (I)

  • Lonchura cucullata Bronze Mannikin. (I)

  • Lonchura punctulata Nutmeg Mannikin. (I)

  • Padda oryzivora Java Sparrow. (I)

Change the sequence of species from Zenaida to Starnoenas to:

  • Ectopistes migratorius

  • Columbina inca

  • Columbina passerina

  • Columbina minuta

  • Columbina talpacoti

  • Claravis pretiosa

  • Claravis mondetoura

  • Starnoenas cyanocephala

  • Geotrygon versicolor

  • Geotrygon montana

  • Geotrygon violacea

  • Geotrygon caniceps

  • Geotrygon leucometopia

  • Geotrygon chrysia

  • Geotrygon mystacea

  • Leptotrygon veraguensis

  • Leptotila verreauxi

  • Leptotila jamaicensis

  • Leptotila cassini

  • Leptotila plumbeiceps

  • Leptotila wellsi

  • Zentrygon carrikeri

  • Zentrygon costaricensis

  • Zentrygon lawrencii

  • Zentrygon albifacies

  • Zentrygon chiriquensis

  • Zentrygon goldmani

  • Zenaida asiatica

  • Zenaida aurita

  • Zenaida auriculata

  • Zenaida macroura

  • Zenaida graysoni

Change the sequence of species from Aratinga to Ara to:

  • Eupsittula nana

  • Eupsittula canicularis

  • Eupsittula pertinax

  • Aratinga nenday

  • Ara severus

  • Ara militaris

  • Ara ambiguus

  • Ara chloropterus

  • Ara macao

  • Ara tricolor

  • Ara ararauna

  • Psittacara holochlorus

  • Psittacara strenuus

  • Psittacara finschi

  • Psittacara euops

  • Psittacara chloropterus

  • Psittacara mitratus

Change the sequence of species in Dendrocincla to:

  • Dendrocincla homochroa

  • Dendrocincla anabatina

  • Dendrocincla fuliginosa

Change the sequence of species formerly in Hyloctistes, Automolus, and Thripadectes to:

  • Clibanornis rubiginosus

  • Thripadectes rufobrunneus

  • Automolus ochrolaemus

  • Automolus subulatus

Change the sequence of species in Saltator to:

  • Saltator atriceps

  • Saltator maximus

  • Saltator grossus

  • Saltator albicollis

  • Saltator coerulescens

  • Saltator striatipectus

Change the sequence of species in Sporophila to:

  • Sporophila minuta

  • Sporophila funerea

  • Sporophila nuttingi

  • Sporophila crassirostris

  • Sporophila corvina

  • Sporophila torqueola

  • Sporophila nigricollis

  • Sporophila lineola

  • Sporophila schistacea

Change the sequence of species formerly in Lonchura and Padda to:

  • Spermestes cucullata

  • Euodice malabarica

  • Euodice cantans

  • Lonchura oryzivora

  • Lonchura punctulata

  • Lonchura malacca

  • Lonchura atricapilla

p. 10. Thalassarche salvini and T. eremita are treated as species separate from T. cauta, following Remsen et al. (2014). In the species account for T. cauta, change the English name to White-capped Albatross, and change the distributional statement and Notes to:

Distribution.—

Breeds on islands off southern Australia and New Zealand, and ranges widely in the southern Pacific and Indian oceans, less commonly in the South Atlantic.

Accidental off the coast of Washington (lat. 47°55′N. long. 125°37′W. ca. 39 miles west of the mouth of Quillayute River, 1 September 1951; specimen USNM; Slipp 1952); also Oregon (October 1996; photos; Hunter and Bailey 1997; and October 2001; photos), California (August-September 1999; photos), and Washington (January 2000; photos), these four records possibly of the same individual (Howell 2012).

Notes.—

Formerly known as Shy Albatross and considered conspecific with T. salvini and T. eremita, but treated as separate species on the basis of differences in plumage and genetic data (Nunn et al. 1996, Abbott and Double 2003a, 2003b) and reports of isolated pairs of one form nesting within the range of another (Tickell 2000).

After the species account for T. cauta, insert the following new account:

Thalassarche salvini (Rothschild). Salvin's Albatross

  • Thalassogeron salvini Rothschild, 1893, Bull. Brit. Ornith. Club 1:58. (New Zealand.)

  • Habitat.—

    Pelagic Waters; breeds on islands.

    Distribution.—

    Breeds on islands off New Zealand and on Crozet Islands, Indian Ocean, and ranges widely in the southern Pacific and Indian oceans, less commonly in the South Atlantic.

    Accidental in Hawaii (Midway Atoll, 8 April 2003; photos; Robertson et al. 2005) and off the coast of Alaska (18 km northwest of Kasatochi Island, Aleutians, 4 August 2003; photos; Benter et al. 2005).

    Notes.—

    See comments under T. cauta.

    In the Appendix, following the species account for Thalassarche chrysostoma (p. 685), insert the following new account:

    Thalassarche eremita Murphy. Chatham Albatross

  • Thalassarche cauta eremita Murphy, 1930, Amer. Mus. Novit. 419:4. (Pyramid Rock off Pitt Island, Chatham Islands.)

  • This species, formerly considered conspecific with T. cauta and T. salvini, breeds on the Chatham Islands, off New Zealand, and ranges at sea in the southern Pacific Ocean. It has been reported off the coast of central California (September 2000; photos; McKee and Erickson 2002; and July 2001; photos; Garrett and Wilson 2003). These records, probably of the same individual, were published as possible T. cauta salvini but were reidentified as T. eremita (Howell 2012) using the characters in Howell (2009). This species is placed in the Appendix pending reconsideration of these records by the California Bird Records Committee.

    p. 50. Preceding the heading Tribe LEPTOPTILINI: Jabirus and Allies, add the following headings and species account:

    Tribe CICONIINI: Typical Storks

    Genus CICONIA Brisson

    Ciconia Brisson, 1760, Ornith. 1, p. 48; 5, p. 361. Type, by tautonymy, Ciconia = Ardea ciconia Linnaeus.

    Ciconia maguari (Gmelin). Maguari Stork

    Ardea Maguari Gmelin, 1789, Syst. Nat. 1: 623; based on “Maguari” of Marcgrave, 1648, Hist. Rerum Nat. Brasiliae, p. 204. (northeastern Brazil.)

    Habitat.—

    Freshwater Marshes, Southern Temperate Grasslands, Low Seasonally Wet Grasslands, Pastures/Agricultural Lands (0–900 m; Tropical Zone).

    Distribution.—

    Northeastern Colombia and Venezuela east through Guianas to Brazil in Roraima, Amapá, and extreme northern Pará. Disjunctly from central and southeastern Brazil, northern and eastern Bolivia south to Paraguay, Uruguay, and central Argentina. Formerly regular nonbreeder in central Chile.

    Casual through eastern Brazil and in southeastern Peru.

    Accidental in Costa Rica (near Gulf of Nicoya, Chomes, Puntarenas province, 16 September 2013; photos; Obando-Calderón et al. 2013).

    pp. 97–98. The hyphen is removed from the English names of Common Black Hawk Buteogallus anthracinus, Cuban Black Hawk B. gundlachii, and Great Black Hawk B. urubitinga because B. anthracinus and B. urubitinga are not sister taxa (Raposo do Amaral et al. 2009; B. gundlachii was not included in the study).

    p. 131. Rallus obsoletus and R. crepitans are treated as species separate from the now extralimital R. longirostris. Remove the account for R. longirostris and insert the following new species accounts in this sequence:

    Rallus obsoletus Ridgway. Ridgway's Rail

  • Rallus elegans var. obsoletus Ridgway, 1874, Am. Nat. 8:111. (San Francisco, California.)

  • Habitat.—

    Salt and brackish marshes, locally (mostly in the Imperial and lower Colorado River valleys) in freshwater marshes (Temperate and Subtropical zones).

    Distribution.—

    [same as for obsoletus group.]

    Notes.—

    See comments under R. crepitans.

    Rallus crepitans Gmelin. Clapper Rail

  • Rallus crepitans Gmelin, 1789, Syst. Nat. 1, pt. 2, p. 713. (“in Noveboraco,” restricted type locality, Long Island, New York.)

  • Habitat.—

    Salt and brackish marshes and mangrove swamps; during migration may be found in freshwater marshes (Tropical and Subtropical zones).

    Distribution.—

    [same as longirostris group except delete South American parts of distribution.] Northernmost populations tend to be partially migratory.

    Notes.—

    Formerly (AOU 1983, 1998) considered conspecific with R. obsoletus and South American R. longirostris Boddaert, 1783 [Mangrove Rail] and sometimes with R. elegans and R. tenuirostris (e.g., Ripley 1977). The five members of this complex are treated as separate species on the basis of strong, although incomplete, reproductive isolation between parapatric populations of R. crepitans and R. elegans in their extensive contact zone, and morphological and genetic differences among other members of the complex commensurate with those between R. crepitans and R. elegans (Maley and Brumfield 2013).

    p. 132. Rallus tenuirostris is treated as a species separate from R. elegans. After the account for R. obsoletus, insert the following new species account:

    Rallus tenuirostris Ridgway. Aztec Rail

  • Rallus elegans var. tenuirostris “Lawrence” Ridgway, 1874, Am. Nat. 8:111. (City of Mexico.)

  • Habitat.—

    Freshwater marshes (1,550–2,800 m; Subtropical and Temperate zones).

    Distribution.—

    [same as tenuirostris group].

    Notes.—

    Formerly considered conspecific with R. elegans, but they are not sister taxa (Maley and Brumfield 2013). See comments under R. crepitans. Also known as Mexican Rail.

    Move the species account for R. elegans to follow the account for R. tenuirostris. Delete information on the tenuirostris group from the habitat and distributional statements in the account for R. elegans, and change the Notes to:

    Notes.—

    See comments under R. crepitans and R. tenuirostris.

    p. 213. Based on Bowen (2013), change the type locality for Synthliboramphus craveri to the following: Golfo della California [Mexico] = (probably) Isla Partida Norte, Gulf of California.

    pp. 229–231. Phylogenetic analyses of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences (Johnson and Weckstein 2011, Banks et al. 2013) have shown that the genus Geotrygon is polyphyletic and that the linear sequence of species currently placed in this genus does not accurately reflect their evolutionary relationships. The type species G. versicolor forms a clade with six other species in our area, but G. veraguensis is sister to the genus Leptotila, and six other species of Geotrygon are sister to the genus Zenaida. These findings result in the following changes:

    Move the heading Genus STARNOENAS Bonaparte and the species account for Starnoenas cyanocephala to a position following the species account for Claravis mondetoura. Insert the following at the end of the species account for Starnoenas cyanocephala:

    Notes.—

    The phylogenetic relationships of this species within the Columbidae are uncertain (Shufeldt 1891, Dickinson and Remsen 2013), but we leave it in its traditional placement near Geotrygon pending further data.

    Add the following under the citation for genus Geotrygon:

    Notes.—

    See comments under Leptotrygon and Zentrygon.

    Revise the composition of Geotrygon and rearrange the linear sequence of species remaining in this genus to:

    • Geotrygon versicolor

    • Geotrygon montana

    • Geotrygon violacea

    • Geotrygon caniceps

    • Geotrygon leucometopia

    • Geotrygon chrysia

    • Geotrygon mystacea

    Insert the following heading in a position following the species account for Geotrygon mystacea:

    Genus LEPTOTRYGON Banks et al

  • Leptotrygon Banks, Weckstein, Remsen, and Johnson, 2013, Zootaxa 3669:185. Type, by original designation, Geotrygon veraguensis Lawrence.

  • Notes.—

    Formerly (AOU 1983, 1998) considered part of Geotrygon, but now treated as separate on the basis of genetic data (Johnson and Weckstein 2011, Banks et al. 2013), which indicate that Leptotrygon is sister to Leptotila.

    Change Geotrygon veraguensis Lawrence to Leptotrygon veraguensis (Lawrence) and place the account for this species under the heading and Notes for Leptotrygon. Add the following to the end of the existing Notes: Formerly placed in the genus Geotrygon. See comments under Leptotrygon.

    Move the genus heading for Leptotila to follow the species account for Leptotrygon veraguensis, and place the species accounts for L. verreauxi, L. jamaicensis, L. cassini, L. plumbeiceps, and L. wellsi in this sequence under the heading for Leptotila.

    Insert the following heading in a position following the species account for Leptotila wellsi:

    Genus ZENTRYGON Banks et al

  • Zentrygon Banks, Weckstein, Remsen, and Johnson, 2013, Zootaxa 3669:185. Type, by original designation, Geotrygon costaricensis Lawrence.

  • Notes.—

    Formerly considered part of Geotrygon (AOU 1983, 1998), but now treated as separate on the basis of genetic data (Johnson and Weckstein 2011, Banks et al. 2013), which indicate that Zentrygon is sister to Zenaida.

    Change the generic names of Geotrygon carrikeri, G. costaricensis, G. lawrencii, G. albifacies, G. chiriquensis, and G. goldmani to Zentrygon, add parentheses around the authority names for each species, make the appropriate changes in generic names or abbreviations within the existing Notes, delete the Notes for Z. goldmani, replace the Notes for Z. lawrencii with “Closely related to Z. costaricensis; the two are reportedly sympatric in Costa Rica.” and place the accounts for these species in this sequence under the heading and Notes for Zentrygon. In the species accounts for all species, add the following to the end of the existing Notes: Formerly placed in the genus Geotrygon. See comments under Zentrygon.

    Move the genus heading for Zenaida to follow the species account for Zentrygon goldmani, and place the species accounts for Zenaida asiatica, Z. aurita, Z. auriculata, Z. macroura, and Z. graysoni in this sequence under the heading for Zenaida.

    p. 233. Three extralimital South American populations of Pyrrhura picta are separated as the species P. amazonum, P. roseifrons, and P. lucianii, following Ribas et al. (2006) and Remsen et al. (2014). Replace the distributional statement and Notes in the species account for P. picta with the following:

    Distribution.—

    Resident in western Panama (Azuero Peninsula), patchily in northern Colombia and northern Venezuela, and from southeastern Venezuela and the Guianas to Brazil north of the Amazon River, east of the Rio Negro.

    Notes.—

    DNA sequence data (Ribas et al. 2006) indicate that the subspecies eisenmanni in Panama is sister to a clade containing Guianan Shield picta and north-central Venezuelan emma, but not P. leucotis (Kuhl, 1820) [Maroon-faced Parakeet]; however, intervening northern South American populations were not sampled. These intervening populations are morphologically intermediate between nominate picta of northeastern Amazonia and eisenmanni. Formerly included P. amazonum Hellmayr, 1906 [Santarem Parakeet], P. roseifrons (Gray, 1859) [Rose-fronted Parakeet], and P. lucianii (Deville, 1851) [Bonaparte's Parakeet] of southern and western Amazonia. These three species do not form a monophyletic group with Pyrrhura picta (Ribas et al. 2006) and are treated as separate species, following Remsen et al. (2014).

    pp. 234–236. Phylogenetic analyses of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences (summarized in Remsen et al. 2013) have shown that the genus Aratinga is highly polyphyletic and that the linear sequence of species currently placed in this genus does not accurately reflect their evolutionary relationships. The type species A. solstitialis forms a clade with five other species, of which the AOU Check-list includes one species, currently placed in the genus Nandayus (see below). Other species currently placed in Aratinga constitute three clades, two of which include species from our area. These findings result in the following changes:

    Insert the following heading in a position following the species account for Conuropsis carolinensis:

    Genus EUPSITTULA Bonaparte

  • Eupsittula Bonaparte, 1853, Compt. Rend. Ac. Sci. Paris 37: 807. Type, by monotypy, Psittacus petzii Leiblein = P. canicularis Linnaeus.

  • Notes.—

    Formerly (e.g., AOU 1983, 1998) included in Aratinga following Peters (1937), but now treated as separate (as in Ridgway 1916) on the basis of genetic data (e.g., Kirchman et al. 2012; summarized in Remsen et al. 2013), which indicate that Eupsittula is not closely related to true Aratinga and is likely the sister genus to Rhynchopsitta.

    Change the generic names of Aratinga nana, A. canicularis, and A. pertinax to Eupsittula, make the appropriate changes in generic names or abbreviations within the existing Notes, and place the accounts for these species in this sequence under the heading and Notes for Eupsittula. Delete the last sentence in the Notes for E. pertinax. In the species accounts for all species, add the following to the end of the Notes: Formerly placed in the genus Aratinga. See comments under Eupsittula.

    Insert the following at the end of the Notes for Genus ARATINGA Spix: See comments under Eupsittula and Psittacara.

    Change Nandayus nenday (Vieillot) (added to the Check-list in Chesser et al. 2013) to Aratinga nenday (Vieillot), delete the genus heading for Nandayus, move the citation for Nandayus into the synonymy of Aratinga, insert the species account for Aratinga nenday to follow the heading and Notes for Aratinga, and insert the following at the beginning of the Notes: Formerly placed in the genus Nandayus, but genetic data (e.g., Ribas and Miyaki 2004, Kirchman et al. 2012; summarized in Remsen et al. 2013) indicate that Nandayus is embedded within Aratinga.

    Insert the following heading in a position following the species account for Ara ararauna:

    Genus PSITTACARA Vigors

  • Psittacara Vigors, 1825, Zool. Journ. 2: 388. Type, by original designation, Psittacus leucophthalmus Statius Müller, 1776.

  • Notes.—

    Formerly included in Aratinga (e.g., AOU 1983, 1998) following Peters (1937), but now treated as separate on the basis of genetic data (e.g., Kirchman et al. 2012; summarized in Remsen et al. 2013), which indicate that Psittacara is not closely related to Aratinga but rather is sister to a group of three extralimital genera (Leptosittaca von Berlepsh & Stolzmann 1894, Diopsittaca Ridgway 1912, and Guaruba Lesson 1830).

    Change Aratinga holochlora (Sclater), Aratinga strenua (Ridgway), Aratinga finschi (Salvin), Aratinga euops (Wagler), Aratinga chloroptera (de Souancé), and Aratinga mitrata (Tschudi) to Psittacara holochlorus (Sclater), Psittacara strenuus (Ridgway), Psittacara finschi (Salvin), Psittacara euops (Wagler), Psittacara chloropterus de Souancé, and Psittacara mitratus (Tschudi), make the appropriate changes in generic names or abbreviations within the existing Notes, and place the accounts for these species in this sequence under the heading and Notes for Psittacara. In the species accounts for all species, add the following Notes (for P. mitratus) or add to the end of the Notes: Formerly placed in the genus Aratinga. See comments under Psittacara.

    p. 266. Ninox japonica is treated as a species separate from N. scutulata (which was added to the Check-list in Chesser et al. 2009). Remove the species account for N. scutulata and replace it with the following new account:

    Ninox japonica (Temminck and Schlegel). Northern Boobook.

  • Strix hirsuta japonica Temminck and Schlegel, 1845, in Siebold, Fauna Japonica, Aves, p. 28, pl. 9B. (Japan.)

  • Habitat.—

    A variety of woodland habitats.

    Distribution.—

    Breeds from southeastern Russian Far East, Korea, and northern and central (possibly southern) China south through Japan and Taiwan, and possibly in the northern Philippines.

    Winters in southern part of breeding range and throughout mainland Southeast Asia, the Philippines, and much of Indonesia.

    Accidental in Alaska (St. Paul Island, Pribilof Islands, 27 August–3 September 2005; photos; Yerger and Mohlmann 2008; and Kiska Island, Aleutian Islands, 1 August 2008; photos of carcass; Bond and Jones 2010), and on Ashmore Reef, Australia.

    Notes.—

    Formerly considered conspecific with Ninox scutulata (Raffles) [Brown Hawk-Owl], but treated as a separate species on the basis of vocal differences (King 2002). Group name changed from Hawk-Owl to Boobook to conform to general usage for this species (e.g., Dickinson and Remsen 2013).

    pp. 350–353. Phylogenetic analysis of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences (Derryberry et al. 2011, Claramunt et al. 2013) has shown that the generic limits and linear sequence of species currently placed in the genera Hyloctistes, Automolus, and Thripadectes do not accurately reflect their evolutionary relationships. Their findings result in the following changes:

    Change Hyloctistes subulatus (Spix) to Automolus subulatus (Spix), delete the genus heading and Notes for Hyloctistes, move the citation for Hyloctistes into the synonymy of Automolus, insert the species account for Automolus subulatus to follow the account for Automolus ochrolaemus, and insert the following at the end of the Notes: Formerly placed in the genus Hyloctistes, but genetic data (Derryberry et al. 2011, Claramunt et al. 2013) indicate that Hyloctistes is embedded within Automolus.

    After the account for Syndactyla subalaris, insert the following heading:

    Genus CLIBANORNIS Sclater and Salvin

  • Clibanornis Sclater and Salvin, 1873, Nomen. Av. Neotrop., pp. 61, 155. Type, by original designation, Anabates dendrocolaptoides Pelzeln.

  • Change Automolus rubiginosus (Sclater) to Clibanornis rubiginosus (Sclater), place the account for this species under the heading for Clibanornis, make the appropriate changes in generic names or abbreviations within the existing Notes, and insert the following at the end of the existing Notes: Formerly placed in the genus Automolus, but genetic data (Derryberry et al. 2011, Claramunt et al. 2013) indicate that C. rubiginosus is part of a clade that is sister to a clade consisting of Thripadectes and Automolus.

    Rearrange the linear sequence of genera and species that follow Syndactyla subalaris as follows:

    • Genus Clibanornis

    • Clibanornis rubiginosus

    • Genus Thripadectes

    • Thripadectes rufobrunneus

    • Genus Automolus

    • Automolus ochrolaemus

    • Automolus subulatus

    p. 355. Phylogenetic analyses of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences (Derryberry et al. 2011, Weir and Price 2011) have shown that the linear sequence of species in the genus Dendrocincla does not accurately reflect their evolutionary relationships.

    Under the heading Genus DENDROCINCLA Gray, insert the following:

    Notes.—

    Linear sequence of species follows Derryberry et al. (2011) and Weir and Price (2011).

    Rearrange the sequence of species of Dendrocincla as follows:

    • Dendrocincla homochroa

    • Dendrocincla anabatina

    • Dendrocincla fuliginosa

    p. 369. Gymnopithys bicolor is considered a species separate from G. leucaspis, following Remsen et al. (2014). Remove the species account for G. leucaspis and replace it with the following account:

    Gymnopithys bicolor (Lawrence). Bicolored Antbird.

  • Pithys bicolor Lawrence, 1863, Ann. Lyc. Nat. Hist. New York 8: 6. (Lion Hill Station, Panamá Railroad.)

  • Habitat.—

    Tropical Lowland Evergreen Forest (0–1,500 m; Tropical Zone).

    Distribution.—

    [same as for bicolor group]

    Notes.—

    Formerly considered conspecific with South American Gymnopithys leucaspis (Sclater) [White-cheeked Antbird]. Treated as a separate species because mitochondrial and nuclear DNA (Brumfield et al. 2007) indicate that G. leucaspis and G. bicolor are not sisters, but that G. leucaspis is sister instead to the South American G. rufigula Boddaert 1783.

    p. 489. Remove the heading Family MEGALURIDAE: Grassbirds (added to the Check-list in Chesser et al. 2010) and the Notes under this heading and replace them with the following heading and Notes:

    Family LOCUSTELLIDAE: Grasshopper-Warblers

  • Notes.—

    Formerly (Chesser et al. 2010) known as Family Megaluridae, but the name Locustellidae has priority when Locustella is included. See comments under Family Sylviidae.

    In the Notes under Family SYLVIIDAE: Sylviid Warblers, replace “Megaluridae” with “Locustellidae.”

    p. 490. After the account for Phylloscopus trochilus, insert the following new species account:

    Phylloscopus collybita (Vieillot). Common Chiffchaff

  • Sylvia collybita Vieillot, 1817, Nouv. Dict. Hist. Nat., nouv. éd., 11, p. 235. (“régions septentrionales” of France; restricted to Normandy by Mayaud, 1941, Oiseau, 11, no. spéc., p. 87.)

  • Habitat.—

    Breeds in a variety of forested habitats and hedgerows with an understory. Winters in similar habitats, but also parks and gardens, and even marshes and mangroves.

    Distribution.—

    Breeds from northern Europe in the British Isles, Denmark, Sweden and central Finland, east across northern Russia to about the Kolyma River and south to Italy, Greece, Bulgaria, Turkey, northern Iran, and Lake Baikal, Altai, and northwestern Mongolia.

    Winters from southern part of breeding range in the Mediterranean region south to North Africa and Senegal and Sudan, the southern Caspian Mountains, the Arabian Peninsula and lower Himalayas east through Nepal, India (West Bengal and western Assam, south to Maharashtra), and Bangladesh.

    Casual in Japan and Thailand.

    Accidental in Alaska (Gambell, St. Lawrence Island, 6–7 June 2012; photos; Lehman and Zimmer 2013).

    Notes.—

    The St. Lawrence Island bird was identified from photos as the easternmost subspecies P. c. tristis Blyth, which has been maintained by some as a separate species based on vocalizations (e.g., Rasmussen and Anderton 2005). Phylloscopus ibericus (Ticehurst, 1937) [Iberian Chiffchaff] and P. canariensis (Hartwig 1886) [Canary Islands Chiffchaff], formerly treated (Vaurie 1959) as a junior synonym of nominate collybita and as a subspecies of P. collybita, respectively, were treated as separate species by Dickinson (2003).

    p. 490. The hyphen is removed from the English name of Pallas's Leaf Warbler Phylloscopus proregulus (added to the Check-list in Banks et al. 2008) because the various species named “Leaf Warbler” do not form a monophyletic group (Olsson et al. 2005, Johansson et al. 2007).

    p. 490. Phylloscopus xanthodryas and P. examinandus are considered species separate from P. borealis. Replace the distributional statement and Notes in the species account for P. borealis with the following:

    Distribution.—

    Breeds in western and central Alaska from the Noatak River and western and central Brooks Range south to southwestern Alaska, the base of the Alaska Peninsula, the Alaska Range, and Susitna River highlands; and in Eurasia from Sweden, northern Russia, and northern Siberia south to central Russia, Mongolia, and Amurland. Recorded in summer north to Barrow and on St. Lawrence Island. Records from St. Matthew Island and Prince Patrick Island (northern Northwest Territories) have not been positively identified as this species or as P. examinandus.

    Winters from Andaman Islands, Southeast Asia, and southeastern China and Taiwan south to eastern Indonesia, Ashmore Reef, and the Philippines.

    Migrates through eastern Asia.

    Casual in California (Monterey, San Luis Obispo, Stanislaus, San Francisco, and Kern counties).

    Notes.—

    See comments under Phylloscopus examinandus.

    After the species account for P. borealis, insert the following new species account:

    Phylloscopus examinandus Stresemann. Kamchatka Leaf Warbler

  • Phylloscopus borealis examinandus Stresemann, 1913, Novit. Zool. 20:353. (Bali.)

  • Habitat.—

    Broadleaf forest, birch, swampy woods, and shrubby areas (rarely pine) below 1,000 m.

    Distribution.—

    Breeds in southern Kamchatka (north to at least 56°N), Sakhalin, the Kuril Islands, and northeastern Hokkaido.

    Wintering range poorly known; specimens from Indonesia (Bali through Sumba; Ticehurst 1938).

    Migrates through northeastern Russia, Japan, and northeastern China.

    Casual in the Aleutians (Attu, Shemya, Amchitka) during spring and autumn migration.

    Notes

    Formerly included in P. borealis along with P. xanthodryas (Swinhoe 1863) [Japanese Leaf Warbler], but treated as separate species on the basis of differences in song and mitochondrial DNA (Saitoh et al. 2010, Alström et al. 2011). Phylloscopus xanthodryas, which breeds in the mountains of Japan (except Hokkaido), has not been reported definitely from North America. The latter species and P. examinandus were formerly considered to constitute P. borealis xanthodryas (Vaurie 1959, Watson et al. 1986); all known reports of P. borealis xanthodryas from the AOU area pertain to P. examinandus.

    pp. 570–571. Change the English group name of Chlorospingus flavopectus, C. tacarcunae, C. inornatus, C. pileatus, C. flavigularis, and C. canigularis from Bush-Tanager to Chlorospingus, following Remsen et al. (2014). These species were transferred recently (Chesser et al. 2011) from the Thraupidae to the Emberizidae; the removal of “Bush-Tanager” from the English names reflects this taxonomic change. In the Notes for C. flavopectus, add the following sentence: Formerly known as Common Bush-Tanager. In the Notes for C. tacarcunae, add the following sentence: Formerly known as Tacarcuna Bush-Tanager. In the Notes for C. inornatus, add the following sentence: Formerly known as Pirre Bush-Tanager. In the Notes for C. pileatus, add the following sentence: Formerly known as Sooty-capped Bush-Tanager. In the Notes for C. flavigularis, add the following sentence: Formerly known as Yellow-throated Bush-Tanager. In the Notes for C. canigularis add the following sentence: Formerly known as Ashy-throated Bush-Tanager.

    p. 592. Preceding the account for Sporophila schistacea, insert the following new species account:

    Sporophila lineola (Linnaeus). Lined Seedeater.

  • Loxia lineola Linnaeus, 1758, Syst. Nat., ed. 10, 1, p. 174. (Asia; error, emended to Surinam by Berlepsch and Hartert, 1902, Novit. Zool. 9:26; further emended to Bahia, Brazil, by Meyer de Schauensee, 1952, Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Philadelphia 104:77.)

  • Habitat.—

    Second-growth Scrub, Riparian Thickets, Pastures/Agricultural Lands (0–1,200 m; Tropical Zone).

    Distribution.—

    Resident in northeastern Brazil from Maranhão, Tocantins, and Bahia eastward. Summer resident from Mato Grosso do Sul, Minas Gerais, and Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, south to north-central Argentina, southeastern Bolivia, Paraguay, and Paraná and São Paulo, Brazil. In winter, widespread throughout South America east of the Andes north of its summer breeding range.

    Accidental in Costa Rica (playa El Rey, Quepos, Puntarenas province, lat. 9°22′45.15′′N. long. 84°03′32.10′′W. 5–7 October 2013; photos; Obando-Calderón et al. 2013).

    p. 592. Sporophila corvina is considered a species separate from S. americana, following Stiles (1996) and Remsen et al. (2014). Remove the species account for S. americana and replace it with the following account:

    Sporophila corvina (Sclater). Variable Seedeater

  • Spermophila corvina Sclater, 1859, Proc. Zool. Soc. London, p. 379. (Playa Vicente, Oaxaca, Mexico.)

  • Habitat.—

    Second-growth Scrub, Tropical Lowland Evergreen Forest Edge, Tropical Deciduous Forest, Secondary Forest (0–1,500 m; Tropical and Lower Subtropical zones).

    Distribution.—

    Resident [corvina group] from northern Oaxaca, southern Veracruz, and Tabasco south on the Gulf–Caribbean slope of Central America to western Panama (Bocas del Toro); and [ophthalmica group] from the Pacific slope of southwestern Costa Rica (north to the Gulf of Nicoya) south through Panama (both slopes, except for Bocas del Toro), western Colombia, and western Ecuador to northwestern Peru. The ophthalmica group was formerly (AOU 1983, 1998) known as the aurita group, but see comments below.

    Notes.—

    Groups: S. corvina (Sclater, 1860) [Black Seedeater] and S. ophthalmica (Sclater, 1860) [Variable Seedeater]. Formerly considered conspecific with South American Sporophila americana (Gmelin 1789) [Wing-barred Seedeater], but treated as a separate species on the basis of similarities in plumage pattern, plumage sequences, distribution, and biometrics, and two localized zones of at least sporadic hybridization between S. corvina and extralimital Sporophila intermedia Cabanis, 1851 [Gray Seedeater], which on this basis are considered to be sister species (Stiles 1996). As noted by Olson (1981b) and Stiles (1996), Sporophilaaurita” Bonaparte 1850 represents intergrades between S. c. corvina and S. c. hicksii Lawrence 1865. The type has disappeared, and it is impossible to assign this name to either of the parental populations.

    pp. 593–594. Phylogenetic analyses of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences indicate that the genus Oryzoborus is embedded within Sporophila. Change Oryzoborus nuttingi Ridgway, Oryzoborus funereus Sclater, and Oryzoborus crassirostris (Gmelin) to Sporophila nuttingi (Ridgway), Sporophila funerea (Sclater), and Sporophila crassirostris (Gmelin), delete the genus heading and notes for Oryzoborus, move the citation for Oryzoborus into the synonymy of Sporophila, and make the appropriate changes in generic names or abbreviations within the existing Notes for each species. In the species accounts for all species, add the following Notes (for S. crassirostris) or add to the end of the existing Notes: Formerly placed in the genus Oryzoborus; see comments under Sporophila.

    Replace the existing Notes under the heading Genus Sporophila Cabanis (p. 591) with the following:

    Notes.—

    DNA sequence data indicate that Oryzoborus, formerly considered a separate genus, is embedded within Sporophila (Lijtmaer et al. 2004, Mason and Burns 2013, Burns et al. 2014), as previously predicted from morphological characters (Olson 1981a). Linear sequence of species follows Mason and Burns (2013) and Burns et al. (2014).

    Rearrange the sequence of species of Sporophila as follows:

    • Sporophila minuta

    • Sporophila funerea

    • Sporophila nuttingi

    • Sporophila crassirostris

    • Sporophila corvina

    • Sporophila torqueola

    • Sporophila nigricollis

    • Sporophila lineola

    • Sporophila schistacea

    p. 625. Junco insularis is considered a species separate from J. hyemalis. In the Notes under genus Junco, delete the last sentence. After the species account for J. hyemalis, insert the following new account:

    Junco insularis Ridgway. Guadalupe Junco.

  • Junco insularis Ridgway, 1876, Bull. Geol. Geog. Surv. Terr. 2, pt. 2, p. 188. (Isla Guadalupe, Baja California.)

  • Habitat.—

    Pine Forest, Pine–Oak Forest (0–1,300 m).

    Distribution.—

    Resident on Guadalupe Island, off Baja California.

    Notes.—

    Formerly considered conspecific with Junco hyemalis, but treated as a separate species on the basis of differences in song, morphology, and DNA sequence data (Mirsky 1976, Aleixandre et al. 2013).

    In the species account for J. hyemalis, remove information on the insularis group from the habitat and distributional statements and change the Notes to the following:

    Notes.—

    Groups: J. hyemalis [Slate-colored Junco], J. oreganus (J. K. Townsend, 1837) [Oregon Junco], J. aikeni Ridgway, 1873 [White-winged Junco], and J. caniceps (Woodhouse, 1853) [Gray-headed Junco]. The groups intergrade to varying degrees. Several other forms may merit recognition as groups: Junco mearnsi Ridgway, 1897 [Pink-sided Junco], of the oreganus group, breeding from southeastern Alberta and southwestern Saskatchewan to eastern Idaho and northwestern Wyoming, and J. dorsalis Henry, 1858 [Red-backed Junco], of the caniceps group, breeding from northern and central Arizona and central New Mexico to western Texas. For detailed information on groups, see Miller (1941). See comments under J. vulcani and J. insularis.

    pp. 631–632. Phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial DNA sequences (Chaves et al. 2013) has shown that the linear sequence of species in the genus Saltator does not accurately reflect their evolutionary relationships.

    Under the heading Genus SALTATOR Vieillot, add the following to the end of the existing Notes: Linear sequence of species follows Chaves et al. (2013).

    Rearrange the sequence of species of Saltator as follows:

    • Saltator atriceps

    • Saltator maximus

    • Saltator grossus

    • Saltator albicollis

    • Saltator coerulescens

    • Saltator striatipectus

    p. 657. DNA sequence data (Powell et al. 2014) indicate that Cacicus melanicterus is sister to a clade consisting of Psarocolius and the other species of Cacicus. Insert the following heading in a position following the species account for Amblycercus holosericeus:

    Genus CASSICULUS Swainson

  • Cassiculus Swainson, 1827, Philos. Mag., new ser., 1: 436. Type, by original designation, Cassiculus coronatus Swainson = Icterus melanicterus Bonaparte.

  • Notes.—

    Ridgway (1902) and Hellmayr (1938) treated this species in the monotypic genus Cassiculus. Blake (1968) merged it into Cacicus, and this was followed in most subsequent classifications (e.g., AOU 1983, 1998). DNA sequence data (Powell et al. 2014), however, indicate that Cassiculus is sister to a clade consisting of Psarocolius and true Cacicus.

    Change Cacicus melanicterus (Bonaparte) to Cassiculus melanicterus (Bonaparte) and place the account for this species under the heading and Notes for Cassiculus. Replace the second sentence of the Notes with the following: Formerly placed in the genus Cacicus. See comments under Cassiculus.

    Delete the citation of Caciculus from the synonymy of Cacicus. Remove the existing Notes under the heading Genus CACICUS Lacépède.

    pp. 682–683. DNA sequence data (Sorenson et al. 2004, Arnaiz-Villena et al. 2009) indicate that the generic limits and linear sequence of species currently placed in the genera Lonchura and Padda do not accurately reflect their evolutionary relationships. Their findings result in the following changes:

    Insert the following heading in a position following the species account for Amandava amandava:

    Genus SPERMESTES Swainson

  • Spermestes Swainson, 1837, Birds W. Africa 1, p. 201. Type, by monotypy, Spermestes cucullata Swainson.

  • Notes.—

    Formerly considered part of Lonchura (AOU 1983, 1998), but now treated as separate because DNA sequence data (Sorenson et al. 2004, Arnaiz-Villena et al. 2009) indicate that Spermestes is not included in true Lonchura.

    Delete the citation of Spermestes from the synonymy of Lonchura. Change Lonchura cucullata (Swainson) to Spermestes cucullata Swainson and place the account for this species under the heading and Notes for Spermestes. Replace the last sentence of the Notes with: Formerly placed in the genus Lonchura. See comments under Spermestes.

    Insert the following heading in a position following the species account for Spermestes cucullata:

    Genus EUODICE Reichenbach

  • Euodice Reichenbach, 1862–1863, Singvögel, p. 46. Type, by subsequent designation (Sharpe, 1890, Cat. Birds Brit. Mus. 13, p. 368), Loxia cantans Gmelin.

  • Notes.—

    Formerly considered part of Lonchura (AOU 1983, 1998), but now treated as separate because DNA sequence data (Sorenson et al. 2004, Arnaiz-Villena et al. 2009) indicate that Euodice is not included in true Lonchura.

    Delete the citation of Euodice from the synonomy of Lonchura. Change Lonchura malabarica (Linnaeus) and Lonchura cantans (Gmelin) to Euodice malabarica (Linnaeus) and Euodice cantans (Gmelin), and place the accounts for these species in this sequence under the heading and Notes for Euodice. Make the appropriate changes in generic names or abbreviations within the existing Notes. Add the following to the end of the Notes for each species: Formerly placed in the genus Lonchura. See comments under Euodice.

    Change Padda oryzivora (Linnaeus) to Lonchura oryzivora (Linnaeus), delete the genus heading and Notes for Padda, move the citation for Padda into the synonymy of Lonchura, insert the species account for Lonchura oryzivora to precede the account for Lonchura punctulata, and insert the following at the end of the Notes: Formerly placed in the genus Padda, but DNA sequence data (Sorenson et al. 2004, Arnaiz-Villena et al. 2009) indicate that Padda is embedded within Lonchura, as treated by Payne (2010).

    p. 683. Change the English name for Lonchura punctulata to Scaly-breasted Munia (as in Inskipp et al. 2001, Robson 2005, Payne 2010, and Rasmussen and Anderton 2012). Change the Notes to read: Formerly known as Nutmeg Mannikin (e.g., AOU 1983, 1998), but name modified to conform to general worldwide usage. Also known as Spotted Munia, Spice Finch, or Ricebird.

    p. 698. Change Oryzoborus angolensis (Linnaeus) to Sporophila angolensis (Linnaeus). Phylogenetic analyses based on sequences of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA indicate that Oryzoborus, formerly considered a separate genus, is embedded within Sporophila (Mason and Burns 2013, Burns et al. 2014).

    pp. 705 ff. Make the following changes to the list of French names of North American birds:

    Insert the following names in the proper position as indicated by the text of this supplement:

    i0004-8038-131-4-CSi-t01.eps

    Rearrange the species sequence in Dendrocincla, Saltator, and Sporophila as indicated by the text of this supplement.

    Rearrange the species sequence from Zenaida to Starnoenas as indicated by the text of this supplement.

    Rearrange the species sequence from Aratinga to Ara as indicated by the text of this supplement.

    Rearrange the sequence of species formerly in Hyloctistes, Automolus, and Thripadectes as indicated by the text of this supplement.

    Rearrange the sequence of species formerly in Lonchura and Padda as indicated by the text of this supplement.

    Proposals considered but not accepted by the committee included transfer of several species of Spinus to Sporagra or Astragalinus, merger of Thick-billed Parrot Rhynchopsitta pachyrhyncha and Maroon-fronted Parrot R. terrisi into a single species, separation of the Cuban Parrot (Amazona leucocephala) complex into two or more species, separation of Siberian Stonechat Saxicola maurus from Common Stonechat S. torquatus, separation of Toxostoma palmeri from Curve-billed Thrasher T. curvirostre, elimination of the subfamily Trogoninae, and transfer of Azure Gallinule Porphyrio flavirostris from the main list to the Appendix.

    ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

    Normand David serves as the committee's advisor for classical languages in relation to scientific names, and Michel Gosselin is the authority for French names. We thank A. Borodayko, R. T. Brumfield, J. Cracraft, B. Freeman, K. L. Garrett, D. D. Gibson, S. N. G. Howell, M. J. Iliff, J. M. Maley, N. A. Mason, R. G. Moyle, G. Obando-Calderón, J. Penhallurick, A. P. Peterson, M. L. P. Retter, B. T. Smith, M. D. Sorenson, C. Stahala, R. C. Tweit, A. Urantówka, J. Withrow, and J. Zook for assistance, suggestions, and comments.

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    Published: 30 July 2014
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